Mani Shankar Aiyar & Ashok Malik – Power to the People: a Gandhian View

Description

"Generations to come, it may well be, will scarce believe that such a man as this one ever in flesh and blood walked upon this Earth", wrote Albert Einstein about Mohandas Gandhi.

On his 145th birthday, the Australia India Institute presents orations and a debate on “Power to the People: a Gandhian view” between two of India’s most influential public commentators: Mani Shankar Aiyar from the left, and Ashok Malik from the right of the political spectrum.

When
Thursday, 2 October 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Lecture Theatre 1, Faculty of Business and Economics Building, 111 Barry Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Government

Political Mobilizations in the Confined Spaces of Israel and Palestine

Description

Recent scholarship on the circulation of children and on the plight of youth trapped in transition in Africa and the Middle East recognizes - from two separate vantage-points - how the circulation of children extends from and then reproduces violence. Displacement (forced and voluntary) and stuck-ness (the inability to transition from childhood to adulthood due to exclusionary economic and political structures) are two related outcomes for young people in contexts of armed conflict and structural violence. Drawing on insights from these two research streams, and based on fieldwork in the region, the seminar examines how Israeli and Palestinian youth perceive and represent themselves in relation to the different contested spaces, both literal and figurative, that they occupy. Historically, the deportation and circulation of one group of children (European Jews) contributed to the transfer of another (Indigenous Arab inhabitants/Palestinian).

The present-day context is comprised of the stuck-ness of Palestinian youth - in camps, behind walls - punctuated by forced deportations, which may be easily contrasted with the mobility of young Jewish settlers in the West Bank/Occupied Palestinian Territories. Yet, these surface plays of power and territoriality are disrupted as well as reinforced by specific political mobilizations of children and youth (as people), and by the circulation of ideas about children and childhood in local and international political discourses. Within the larger geopolitics of the conflict, both Israeli and Palestinian youth are stuck in circulation, with limited room for maneuver. Still, they narrate their everyday living experiences as forms of resistance within confined spaces, and these narratives involved creative encounters with the ideas of childhood, gender, agency, citizenship, place, conflict and peace.

Born and raised in Northern Ireland, Siobhán McEvoy-Levy is Associate Professor of Political Science and Department Chair at Butler University in Indiana. She has two decades of teaching, researching, and training experience in the fields of peace and conflict studies/international studies including US-based service-learning courses and international field seminars, and encompassing topics of conflict analysis, peacebuilding theory, peace processes, post-conflict peacebuilding, transitional justice, education for peace, human rights, youth and gender in conflict, the making of and implementation of youth policies, political communication and US foreign policy.

When
Thursday, 16 October 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
Theatre 230, 234 Queensberry Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Poetry Reading: Land Before Lines

Description

A special event featuring photographer Nicholas Walton-Healey and readings by poets affiliated with the University of Melbourne.

This event celebrates photographer Nicholas Walton-Healey's contribution to Australian poetry through photography. In Land Before Lines, Walton-Healey's portraits are themselves a historical register of Melbourne's poets, but have also stimulated a breaking forth of new works: a book of souls and what they say.

Readings by Kevin Brophy, Justin Clemens, Michael Farrell, Fiona Hile, Duncan Hose, Bella Li and Corey Wakeling.

When
Thursday, 9 October 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
Linkway Meeting Room, John Medley Building

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Greg Dening Memorial Lecture, ‘Who Knows the Weather’

Description

In a poem entitled 'Greeting', John Shaw Neilson calls out to his readers: 'What of the wind? Who knows the weather? Shall we be old men in the street'. Re-reading this recently Ross Gibson was thrown to an instant in one of his favourite films, called Lost Book Found by Jem Cohen. The film is a kind of street-history of New York City as if dreamed by a mendicant monk. There's a moment in it that resonates to Neilson's poem: jostled by crowds and basted with evening light, the camera seems to be drifting down a Manhattan street when a vagrant hustles up from the crowd that is surging along.

As this old man passes he looks down the lens for a blink and mutters, 'I'm in love with the world'. Lasting no more than a heatbeat, the moment gleams as part epiphany part mystery. And it grants the viewer a new understanding of the verve and bluster in the city that Cohen is examining.

The way thought and memory work, this little montage might zap you into thinking about Greg Dening. As many things do. Here is the intellectual intimacy so characteristic of Greg, plus the sense of love and wonder for the thing being investigated, and the roundabout ways one can feel how everything alters, or should, in any encounter between oneself and the world.

In this year's Greg Dening lecture, Gibson brings a similar spirit of inquiry to his account of an archive that he is currently studying, alongside a multi-disciplinary team of artists and historians. The archive is a collection of films that have been compiled by three generations of a farming family in the Wimmera, which is John Shaw Neilson's country, as well as Djab Wurrung and Jardwadjali country. The archive is a record of inter-generational and multi-modal custodianship that leads us into history, into country, into the relationships meshing people, things and the lively world. Greg Dening would have loved it. Gibson and his collaborators are trying to do it justice. Which, he notes, is like trying to know the weather.

Ross Gibson is Centenary Professor in Creative & Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. Recent works include The Summer Exercises (2009) and 26 Views of the Starburst World (2012), both books published by UWAP.

When
Thursday, 9 October 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
North Gallery, Ian Potter Museum of Art, 800 Swanston Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Australian Art and Artists in Post-War London

Description

In this lecture Simon Pierse sheds new light on the role that Sir Kenneth Clark (later Baron Clark of Saltwood) played in bringing Australian art to a new audience in Britain during the early 1950s. Pierse examines the crucial part that Joseph Burke, inaugural Herald Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne, had in directing Clark’s attention towards the work of Sidney Nolan and Arthur Boyd and attempts to discover what may have lain beneath Clark’s abiding passion for Australian art and life.

Simon Pierse is Senior Lecturer at Aberystwyth University and visiting fellow at the Australian Institute of Art History. His research focuses on British perceptions of Australian art, landscape and identity. His award winning book Australian Art and Artists in London, 1950-1965: an antipodean summer, was published by Ashgate in 2012.

When
Wednesday, 8 October 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre D, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

BEHAVIOURAL PUBLIC POLICY: FUTURE CHALLENGES

Description

A specialist education opportunity designed for middle managers and senior executives in government, as well as those working closely with government in not-for-profit and commercial organisations.

People do not always behave rationally and the idea that effective public policy should embrace this fact has taken hold in recent years. In the UK, in particular, the concept of behavioural public policy has made great inroads at Whitehall where trials have had great success at little cost. Australian Government agencies are increasingly embracing the idea too: there is a groundswell of interest in how 'nudge' policy has been effective. But such policies have also come under increasingly fierce criticism on the grounds that it is just another springboard for liberal paternalism and that questionable ethical judgements may be inherent to these approaches. In this workshop, we take stock of the progress made with behavioural policy insights – and consider how far we can push the insights gained into new policy domains.

When
Thursday, 23 October 2014, 1:00 pm

Where
West Room, Level 10, The Woodward Centre , Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Government

Disinvestment and Decommissioning of Public Services

Description

A specialist education opportunity designed for middle managers and senior executives in government, as well as those working closely with government in not-for-profit and commercial organisations.

Australia, like all developed economies, is debating the sustainability of its health care system, and whether significant changes to public services are needed to ensure quality and efficiency. With increasingly tight budgets the thorny issue of how to spend less on particular health care services or outmoded practices becomes crucial. Health care organisations have long struggled with how to disinvest from treatments and interventions in an evidence based way. Recently attention has turned to how we might decommission and/or change services. This workshop explores what the concepts of disinvestment and decommissioning mean and tools that support decision making in public services. It draws on national and international best practice in the area and uses case studies and examples from practice to illustrate the issues.

When
Thursday, 13 November 2014, 1:00 pm

Where
West Room, Level 10, The Woodward Centre, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Government

How Does Culture Contribute to Development?

Description

Interactive Q&A Panel Discussion

This event is hosted by the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Melbourne School of Government and is part of the ICOM-CC 17th Triennial Conference being held this year in Melbourne from 15 to 19 September 2014.

The theme of ICOM-CC’s 17th Triennial Conference is Building Strong Culture through Conservation. By preserving cultural materials essential to the continuation of collective memory, conservation helps rebuild communities which have been damaged through war, natural disaster, or displacement, and contributes to the identity of thriving communities. Access to cultural material directly contributes to what Amartya Sen describes as ‘functionality’ - giving individuals the tools we need to understand our place in the world, and ‘capability’ - giving us the ability to make choices about our place in the world. When people have access to their cultural material they are able to participate in assessment of their history and historical position, understand where their knowledge was derived from, build educational foundations, and engage creatively in the future. These are very much the hallmarks of social inclusion that contributes to social transformation. However, culture remains a silent partner in many significant international development agendas, such as the Millennium Development Goals and is often the gilding rather than the core of international government programs.

This Q&A will explore the intersection of culture and international development by grappling with the following questions:

• How might we measure the impact of culture on international development?

• Who are the key actors in cultural development and whose interests do they serve?

• How does ‘strong culture’ assist economic development and social resilience?

• In what ways can development strategies incorporate principles and practices of cultural conservation?

• How do communities manage generational shifts in how culture is valued and transmitted?

Expert Panellists

Professor Lyndal Prott, Director of UNESCO's Division of Cultural Heritage

Estelle Parker , Deputy State Director, Victoria State Office, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Australia.

Luis da Costa Ximenes, Director of Belun, and Emilio Vicente Noronha, Project Manager of Belun

• Moderated by Associate Professor Robyn Sloggett, Director of the Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation (CCMC) and the Co-Chair of the 17th Triennial Conference of the International Council of Museums Committee for Conservation (ICOM-CC), Building Strong Culture Through Conservation

When
Tuesday, 16 September 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
Room 105 & 106, Melbourne Convention Centre, 1 Convention Centre Place, Melbourne

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

New Histories of Sexualities

Description

Gender, Sexuality and Intimacy in Australia’s 1980s by Associate Professor Frank Bongiorno

The 1980s has been widely recognised as a period of significant and rapid change in Australian life; Paul Kelly called his near-contemporary account of the period’s politics The End of Certainty. Historians of homosexuality have been prominent in interpreting the era, notably in connection with the AIDS crisis, the development of a gay commercial culture, and the rise of the gay media. But the period’s significance for the wider history of gender and sexuality remains uncertain, for most commentators have so far been reluctant to move beyond narrating high politics and public culture. Here, Associate Professor Bongiorno will sketch out the treatment of the themes of gender, sexuality and intimacy in a book he is writing on Australia between 1983 and 1991. While some commentators at the time thought that they detected a backlash against the libertarian values of sexual revolution, Associate Professor Bongiorno explores the alternative idea of the 1980s as part of a continuing transformation that reshaped the intimate life and its representation in public discourse in the late twentieth century. This is more a story of continuity than rupture, of a ‘revolution’ accomplished rather than one ‘betrayed’.

Postsecular Sex? The New Christian Right and Sex in Australia since the 1970s by Dr Tim Jones

From the early 1970s, conservative Christian engagement with politics was revitalised through the formation and reorganisation of a number of lobby groups. These New Christian Right (NCR) groups, including the Festival of Light, were formed to combat changes in Australian sexual mores. Of particular concern were changes to censorship, and the growing acceptance of feminism and gay liberation. Commentators saw the rise of the NCR as a sign of resurgent fundamentalism, a reversal of secularism, or as an incursion of US religious politics into secular Australia. This paper analyses the rise of the NCR through a postsecular lens. Rather than reading the emergence of the NCR as a reaction against sexual change, it shows how the NCR was constituted through sexual contests and how the ‘religious’ became implicated in subsequent sexual change in Australia.

“Jewish+Lesbian= ‘Jesbian’” by Dr Jordy Silverstein

At the beginning of 2014, Leah and Amanda became one of the first pairs of Jewish lesbians to have a Jewish wedding in Melbourne. Held at the Abbotsford Convent and officiated by a Reform rabbi, this ceremony was a Jewish religious ceremony that had no relationship to the Australian state. In this ceremonial search for a ritual that would be true to themselves, would express their love, and would produce a sense of communal ‘normality’, dominant discourses of both Jewish and Australian marriages were simultaneously challenged and reinforced.

In this paper Dr Silverstein will explore the ways that Leah and Amanda articulated their experience in an oral history interview conducted a few months after their wedding. Through this one example some of the broader complexities of studying Australian histories of sexuality at this moment in time will be canvassed. When discussions of normativity - whether homo or hetero - dominate many discussions, what can be offered by a historicisation of that 'normativity'? This paper will offer one response, by delving into this one example from the oft-forgotten sexual histories of migrant and religious minority groups.

This is a meeting of the Melbourne Feminist History Group.

When
Tuesday, 23 September 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Theatre 3, Alan Gilbert Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Kenneth Clark and Australian Art

Description

In this lecture Simon Pierse sheds new light on the role that Sir Kenneth Clark (later Baron Clark of Saltwood) played in bringing Australian art to a new audience in Britain during the early 1950s. Pierse examines the crucial part that Joseph Burke, inaugural Herald Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Melbourne, had in directing Clark’s attention towards the work of Sidney Nolan and Arthur Boyd and attempts to discover what may have lain beneath Clark’s abiding passion for Australian art and life.

Simon Pierse is Senior Lecturer at Aberystwyth University and visiting fellow at the Australian Institute of Art History. His research focuses on British perceptions of Australian art, landscape and identity. His award winning book Australian Art and Artists in London, 1950-1965: an antipodean summer, was published by Ashgate in 2012.

When
Thursday, 25 September 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre D, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events