Is the Indian Ocean destined to become India’s Ocean?

Description

The Indian Ocean is shaping up to become a major strategic battleground of the 21st century. The rise of India and China is shaping a new regional balance of power in the Indo-Pacific. Just as China is now asserting itself in the Pacific, India aspires to be the leading power in the Indian Ocean.

In this Tiffin Talk, David Brewster (author) will discuss "India’s Ocean: The Story of India’s Bid for Regional Leadership, David Brewster examines India’s growing strategic role in the Indian Ocean. It asks:

  • What are India’s strategic ambitions in the Indian Ocean?
  • Who are India’s regional military partners?
  • How is India responding to the growing Chinese presence in the region?
  • How will this contest affect Australia?
  • The future of the Indian Ocean will be a competition between great powers.
  • Is it destined to become India’s Ocean?

‘What happens in the Indian Ocean will define India’s strategic future, and that in turn will do a great deal to set Asia’s course in the Asian Century. David Brewster gives us a perfect guide to the forces shaping India’s role in the Ocean that bears its name. It is a lucid, lively, comprehensive and judicious account of one of the central strategic questions of our times.' – Professor Hugh White, Australian National University

When
Thursday, 31 July 2014, 1:00 pm

Where
Seminar Room, Australia India Institute , 147 - 149 Barry St, Carlton

Booking
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Making us Resilient: Responsible citizens for uncertain times

Description

To inculcate the obligations of responsibility – has this not been the aspiration of almost all who hope to govern human beings, who seek to implant technologies of ‘self-mastery’ in each individual who is to live their lives in a condition of freedom rather than of domination? In this lecture, Nikolas Rose locates this repeated return to the theme of responsibility within the genealogy of ‘ethopolitics’ – the ways in which sentiments, values and beliefs are deployed as a medium through which the self-government of the individual can be linked with the imperatives of good government.

He briefly reviews some of the configurations for the ‘conduct of conduct’ from the mid-nineteenth century to the present in which responsibility has been central. From this perspective, he examines the rise of the term ‘resilience’ in contemporary ethopolitics, and suggests that the ethic of responsibility is being reworked in the context of a concern with managing individual and collective conduct in the face of pervasive insecurity and uncertainty concerning the future.

While some see the rise of resilience strategies as a neoliberal apotheosis of reactionary individualism, Nikolas concludes by exploring whether, and in what ways, these new strategies, and the technologies of citizenship to which they are linked, might provide opportunities for a more progressive politics.

Nikolas Rose is Professor of Sociology and Head of the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine at King’s College, London. He was previously (2006-2011) Martin White Professor of Sociology and Director of the BIOS Centre for the Study of Bioscience, Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Society at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

He is also co-PI for the EPSRC funded Centre for Synthetic Biology and Innovation (CSynBI) and part of the Ethics and Society Division of the Human Brain Project. His recent work has focused on the drivers, nature and implications of developments in the life sciences and biotechnology and more generally on the relations between the social sciences and the life sciences.

His most recent books are The Politics of Life Itself : Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century (Princeton, 2006); Governing The Present (with Peter Miller, Polity, 2008) and Neuro: the New Brain Sciences and the Management of the Mind (with Joelle Abi-Rached, Princeton, 2013).

He is a longstanding member of the Editorial Board of Economy and Society, co-editor of BioSocieties: an interdisciplinary journal for social studies of the life sciences, and has been Chair of the European Neuroscience and Society Network, and a member of numerous advisory groups including the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

When
Thursday, 28 August 2014, 4:00 pm

Where
Ian Potter Auditorium, Kenneth Myer Building, Royal Parade, Parkville

Booking
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Whales, Antarctica, Forests and Climate Change

Description

The Role of International Activism and National Leadership in Saving the Planet

Australia has a mixed record when it comes to international environmental policy-making. Widely acknowledged as a global leader on issues such as whaling and protecting the Antarctic environment, Australian governments have also lagged behind, or even stymied, international efforts to protect forests and to mitigate the effects of climate change. Why has Australia led in some areas, and fallen behind in others? This seminar aims to uncover aspects of the history of international environmentalism from an Australian perspective, using case studies to illuminate our chequered history of environmental achievement. What role, if any, have Australian activists, policy makers, diplomats and leaders played in saving our planet?

Professor Robyn Eckersley (School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Melbourne) explores the question of why Australia has mostly been a laggard in climate policy and climate diplomacy, and what needs to happen for this to change.

Dr Gerry Nagtzaam (Faculty of Law, Monash University) examines the role of Australia in securing a global moratorium on the commercial hunting of whales and in the recent International Court of Justice decision on 'scientific whaling'. He looks at its implications for the Australia/Japan relationship, the IWC and the whales.

Dr Brett Bennett (Institute for Culture and Society, the University of Western Sydney) examines the global movement of governments in putting large forests with perceived high conservation value into national parks or protected areas that are "locked" away from intensive logging and economic exploitation, and compares the mechanisms by which forests have been protected in the US and Australia.

Emma Shortis (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, the University of Melbourne) discusses an unprecedented environmental achievement: the comprehensive protection of the Antarctic continent in the late 1980s and the role played by Australia in saving what Bob Hawke called "the one remaining pristine continent".

‘Australia in the World’ is a lecture and seminar series that presents international and transnational perspectives on the past. The series highlights the interconnectedness of past worlds and future challenges with speakers from around the country and across the globe.

Supported by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies.

When
Friday, 22 August 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
North Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building

Booking
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Whatever Happened to Democracy?

Description

Two weeks or so before the last election, when Joe Hockey had good reason to believe he would be treasurer in a new Coalition government, he ridiculed the demand that he should explain how the Coalition would pay for its policies. Such disdain for the need of citizens to have informed reasons for their vote should be astonishing. Yet it seems that many of us took it as more or less par for the course. Decades of contempt for our political intelligence, indeed of our political literacy, has made us worse than disillusioned: it has made us cynical, and to such a degree that we find it hard to speak without irony - sometimes urbane, sometimes bitter - of the dignity of policies. Professor Gaita will explore what we have lost and what we need to recover it if we are to resist a drift towards authoritarianism as the effects of climate change become dramatically apparent.

When
Wednesday, 6 August 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, The University of Melbourne

Booking
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When Hollywood was Right

Description

Hollywood was not always a bastion of liberalism. Following World War II, an informal alliance of movie stars, studio moguls, and Southern California business interests formed to revitalize a factionalized Republican Party. Coming together were stars such as John Wayne, Robert Taylor, George Murphy, and many others who joined studio heads Cecil B. DeMille, Louis B. Mayer, Walt Disney, and Jack Warner to rebuild the Republican Party. They found support among a large group of business leaders who poured money and skills into this effort, which paid off with the election of George Murphy to the U.S. Senate and of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan to the highest office in the nation. This is an exciting story based on extensive new research that will forever change how we think of Hollywood politics.

Donald T. Critchlow is a Professor of History at Arizona State University. He has authored and edited numerous books, including The Conservative Ascendancy: How the GOP Made Political History (2007, revised 2011); Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism (2005); and Intended Consequences: Birth Control, Abortion, and the Federal Government (1999).

He is currently working on a data-driven book, American Democracy Now and its Future. He is editor of the Journal of Policy History, an interdisciplinary quarterly published by Cambridge University Press, and general editor of the Cambridge Essential Histories Series.

When
Wednesday, 6 August 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts Building

Booking
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Between the local and the global: Foreign languages in the crossfire

Description

The teaching and learning of foreign /second languages today is caught between the need to acquire 'usable skills' in predictable cultural contexts and the fundamental unpredictability of global contexts. It has become difficult to reconcile the local and the global, the traditionally monolingual mandate of foreign language education (e.g., "study French in order to get to know the French") and the multilingual realities of our age (e.g., "study French in order to be able to speak with Canadians or Africans, or to code-switch between French, English, Swahili or Arabic").

Moreover, much of the little c culture of everyday life has been infiltrated by a global culture of consumerism that is no longer specific to any particular country. In short, foreign language study is torn between its national premise and its transnational/global entailments. On the one hand, mindful of their mission to teach the national language, literature and culture of a given national speech community, teachers strive to impart a mastery of the standard language that will enable learners to become educated users of the language, to communicate with native speakers and to read the literature written by and for native speakers. On the other hand, as global communications have become more and more multimodal and multilingual and potential interlocutors are not necessarily monolingual native nationals but other multilingual non-native speakers, foreign language learners have to learn, as the 2007 MLA Report advocates, how to "operate between languages" (p.35), i.e., how to develop a linguistic and cultural competence across multilingual contexts. How can FL teachers take into account the changing contexts of language use for which they are preparing their students, without losing the historical and cultural awareness that comes from studying one national language, literature and culture? Exploring these challenges from the perspective of applied linguistics can shed light both on the relation of language and culture and on second language acquisition in institutional settings.

Claire Kramsch is Professor of German and Affiliate Professor of Education at UC Berkeley, and the former Director of the Berkeley Language Center, which she founded in 1994. She teaches second language acquisition and applied linguistics and directs Ph.D. dissertations in the German Department and in the Graduate School of Education. She is the past president of AAAL and the past editor of the international journal Applied Linguistics. Over the last thirty years, she has been active in foreign language teacher development and has written extensively on language, discourse, and culture in applied linguistics. In 1998, Prof. Kramsch received the Goethe Medal from the Goethe Institute in Weimar for her contributions to cross-cultural understanding between the United States and Europe.

In 2002, she received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Modern Language Association as well as the Faculty Distinguished Teaching Award from UC Berkeley. She is the 2007 recipient of the AAAL Distinguished Scholarship and Service Award. Professor Kramsch is the author of several books including Discourse Analysis and Second Language Teaching (1981), Language and Culture (1998J, Context and Culture in Language Teaching (1993) and The Multilingual Subject (2009). These last two publications received the Mildenberger Prize from the MLA. She is the editor of Redrawing the Boundaries of Language Study (Heinle, 1995) and Language Acquisition and Language Socialization. Ecological Perspectives (Continuum, 2002).

When
Wednesday, 6 August 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre D, Old Arts Building

Booking
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“Eating Italian is Speaking Italian: the Language of Food in Renaissance Italy”

Description

Food and cuisine, like any cultural phenomenon, constitute organized systems with rules and regulations that function much like a language does.

The language of food that developed in Italy during the Renaissance is an elaborate system known to us thanks to treatises on table manners, serving at tables, carving rules, pouring wine in an appropriate manner, and dietary theories.

This lecture shows how the establishment of the Italian language in the course of the Renaissance went hand in hand with the development of the grammar of food.

Eating Italian is speaking Italian.

When
Thursday, 7 August 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Booking
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A “New” India in the Making: Myths, Realities, and Ideals – Research Symposium on Contemporary India

Description

The Australia India Institute and the School of Social and Political Sciences, at the University of Melbourne present A “New” India in the Making: Myths, Realities, and Ideals - Research Symposium on Contemporary India

Much has been written about a “New” India, which is a cumulative and tumultuous experience of the ongoing shifts and tensions in the economy, society, the collective and individual consciousness, and expectations.

However, the content of this new India remains undefined and contested, constantly pulled and pushed by the multiple forces of the past and its unformed future. India’s history and its immediate destiny are redefined and reinvented in the present with an “authentic” vernacular view that crosses, melds, and interacts with an increasingly “global and modernist” one.

The net result is a “New” India that presents an ensemble of myths, realities, and ideals that are neither static nor settled.

In this research symposium, three scholars critically examine different social sites of a “New” India with an interdisciplinary, historical, and humanistic ways.

When
Tuesday, 9 September 2014, 2:00 pm

Where
Seminar Room, Australia India Institute , 147-149 Barry St Carlton VIC 3053

Booking
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The Future of Power – will it be ‘soft power’?

Description

As we witness the power shift from the West to the East, Indian leaders from all fields, including science, media, politics, business and the arts, are being brought into dialogue to explore what kind of power India will bring to the world. Can Indian leaders re-emerge sustainable power, 'soft power', the power of awareness, ethics and culture? Is it time we talked openly and honestly about power?

Australian born, Maureen Chen, has spent the last four years touring India to organise 'the future of power' dialogue series in 32 cities, with many more planned. She has been instrumental to bring over 1,500 leaders to the table, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi, G. Madhavan Nair, Subhash Ghai and Anu Aga, MP. This project is an initiative of Nizar Juma, a Kenyan Industrialist and the Brahma Kumaris, an NGO affiliated to the UN with General Consultative Status with ECOSOC under the DPI.

Light refreshments will be provided.

When
Wednesday, 6 August 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Seminar Room, Australia India Institute, 147 - 149 Barry St Carlton VIC 3053

Booking
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2014 Ernest Scott Prize Winner Announced

The Faculty of Arts, in conjunction with The Australian Historical Association, is excited to announce the winner of the 2014 Ernest Scott Prize is: 

Angela Wanhalla, for Matters of the Heart. A History of Interracial marriage in New Zealand, Auckland University Press, Auckland, NZ 2013.

wanhalla

Angela Wanhalla’s ground breaking history of interracial relationships in New Zealand across two hundred years utilises not only the usual range of church and state records but also personal papers, family and local histories to track the lives of couples whose relationship was sustained over a period of time.  While Maori women left little trace for the historian, Wanhalla uses analysis of images, particularly photography, to overcome some of the gaps and silences in the record. She takes a broad view of coupling which incorporates common law relationships, Maori ceremonies and Christian marriages sanctioned by the State and also takes account of various debates and legislative action in relation to marriage over time.

Wanhalla draws on the recent work by anthropologists and historians such as Ann Laura Stoler to explore the history of emotion and sentiment as central to these encounters. She historicises the specific context in which these are expressed and how they changed over time in relation to the society and demographics. She notes that interracial relationships in New Zealand have often been used as evidence of ‘gentle colonialism’ but while  her study of intimacy makes an important contribution to overturning simplistic paradigms of race relations on the frontier and beyond,  Wanhalla still  emphasises the framework of gendered and racial power struggles within which these relationships operated.

This book is beautifully written, clearly structured and Wanhalla wears her extensive scholarship lightly so the reader has the pleasure of reading fascinating personal stories combined with sharp analysis.

Congratulations Angela.

The 2014 Ernest Scott prize is worth approximately $13,000 and was judged by Professor Paula Hamilton from the University of Technology, Sydney, and Professor Tom Brooking from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

 

The following publications were shortlisted for the prize, and are also highly commended:

Janis Sheldrick, Nature’s Line George Goyder: Surveyor, environmentalist, visionary, Wakefield Press, Kentown, South Australia, 2013.

Sheldrick

Sheldrick succeeds in combining the infrequently matched genres of environmental history and biography.  This eloquently written biography thereby advances Donald Meinig’s classic study of the line of reliable rainfall by revealing much more about the extraordinary life of the far-sighted George Goyder. Sheldrick makes a powerful case that Goyder was as important to Australia’s environmentalism as John Muir was to American environmentalism and early conservation. Goyder played a critical role as surveyor-general in establishing forestry, protecting native forest and overseeing the settlement of South Australia as well as much of what later became known as the Northern Territories. Unlike most of his contemporaries he realised that agriculture was not viable beyond certain points because of the variability of South Australia’s climate. Some settlers ignored his advice while various commentators ridiculed him, but the difficulty of farming such country proved Goyder right. He also acted as an engineer overseeing both drainage and irrigation schemes and became in Joe Powell’s arresting phrase a ‘landscape author’.  Although ‘sustainability’ is a relatively recent concept Goyder was intuitively working his way towards some such notion. Even more important, this attractively produced, scholarly and comprehensive biography shows that this remarkable surveyor and engineer stood above most of his contemporaries and later day equivalents because of his ability to think long term and gaze deep into the future.  This book is, therefore, of interest to environmental historians and environmentalists everywhere.

Bruce Scates, ANZAC Journeys: Returning to the Battlefields of World War II, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne, 2013.

Scates

This compelling and scholarly book builds and improves upon Scates’ earlier Return to Gallipoli: Walking the Battlefields of the Great War (2006). In this second volume Scates greatly extends the range of his inquiries from more familiar European battlefields to Asian, African and Pacific sites of battle as well as naval battles, and men lost fighting the war in the air.  Equally impressive is his use of interviews of both veterans and family members to capture the emotion of travelling to long inaccessible graves of loved ones and mates.  By interviewing wives, daughters and sweethearts, Bruce (and his collaborators – Alexandra McKosker, Keir Reeves, Rebecca Wheatley and Damien Williams) break down the narrow masculinist perspective of most books on war and loss. This passionate account of journeys thereby reveals much about commemoration, pilgrimage and memory as well as military history. Scates adds to the important work of scholars like Ken Inglis and Jay Winter as, in his own words, this books traverses ‘emotional’ as well as physical landscapes. This senior historian gets the tone of commemoration about right without descending into glib glorification or careless celebration. Even if the book fails to live up to its Anzac title by not mentioning New Zealanders it remains an important and powerful piece of Australian historical writing on universal themes that will appeal to a wide range of readers.

Paul Moon, Encounters. The Creation of New Zealand. A History, Penguin Books, Auckland, 2013.

MoonThis volume engages with a wide range of source material especially imagery, narratives and sites to explore how New Zealand has been imagined across two centuries.  The very different ways migrants, visitors, settlers and Maori experienced and interpreted the landscape reveal competing visions which shaped New Zealand’s future.   While it has resonances with Richard White’s Inventing Australia (1981) and Ross Gibson’s earlier research on the southern lands that were the subject of rich mythologising by Europeans, The Diminishing Paradise (1984), this volume draws on two more recent areas of scholarship to create a very different and innovative work. The first is research in environmental history and the cultural construction of landscape which has led Moon to examine ideas about ‘wild’ New Zealand, environmental ‘purity’ and the concept of the sublime utilised to understand and explain the magnificence of New Zealand as a place of encounter. The second is the field of heritage tourism and popular historical consciousness, which allows Moon to explore memory that is ‘more of a cultural practice which drifts into the imagination’ or nostalgia for objects and ruins that has sometimes ossified Maori traditions and romanticised the colonial past.  The result is a richly evocative study which should be read by all who value the distinctiveness of this country.

The Ernest Scott Prize is awarded annually to work based upon original research which is, in the opinion of the examiners, the most distinguished contribution to the history of Australia or New Zealand or to the history of colonisation. Click here for more information about the Ernest Scott Prize.

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