Museums for Contemporary Art in Central Europe

Description

For countries in Central Europe the revolution in 1989 meant a new freedom in cultural activity and artistic creation, the beginning of transparent principles in financing culture, the end of censorship, as well as unhampered access to international cooperation. It is certainly one of the most symbolic dates in history. A period of transition began, when fully democratic states and societies were built. As an important element of civil societies, culture was also involved in the process of adaptation to the rules of free-market economy. But it does not mean that in institutions collecting and exhibiting art this transformation occurred instantly.

An exception in Central Europe was Hungary, where initiatives aimed at creating a museum of contemporary art commenced before 1989. The record of Central European institutions devoted to modern and contemporary art before that date statistically does not look so bad but they were almost exclusively institutions collecting and presenting art in general, with 20th-century art forming just one area of interest.

There were just a few specialised institutions – in Poland the Museum of Art in Łódź and Zachęta in Warsaw. After the break-down of financing culture in the 1990s and stagnation in developing museum infrastructure the situation changed with the dawn of the new century and the prospect of joining the European Union, which opened new possibilities for financing museums.

This lecture will present a panorama of Central European museums– looking back to the end of 19th century and the evolution of institutions dealing with collecting and presenting of contemporary art, as well as present museums’ panorama after 1989, which in the 21st century resulted in a museum boom.

Dr Katarzyna Jagodzińska's academic research explores museum studies, especially in the region of Central Europe. She has a Ph.D. in Art History (2012) and is a graduate of Art History (M.A.) and Journalism and Communication (B.A., M.A.), Jagiellonian University, Krakow. She is an author of over 60 articles in the field of museums and art history in academic and specialist magazines and volumes (author of four chapters in a first academic textbook devoted to the issue of culture and development in Poland released in 2014 – Kultura i rozwój), member of the editorial team of the HERITO quarterly and local editor of the RIHA Journal – international academic journal of art history, member of ICOM, AICA and Association of Art Historians in Poland. She works as an Art critic and curator.

When
Monday, 24 November 2014, 6:30 pm

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

2014 Kate Challis (RAKA) Award winner announced

The Faculty of Arts, in conjunction with The Australian Centre, is excited to announce the winner of the 2014 Kate Challis (RAKA) Award. 

We sincerely congratulate the winner of the 2014 Kate Challis (RAKA) award, Ivan Sen, for his screenplay Toomelah.

4993_RAKA Award Holding Slides_1280x720px_023

Judges’ citation:

This challenging, raw and insightful drama is deeply invested in both the history and the present of the Gamilaroi people in the Toomelah community in northwest New South Wales.  The young Gamilaroi boy Kiren is at the heart of the screenplay, and as he makes his way through the community he enables us to think about where it has been and where it might be heading. The screenplay works steadily and surely towards a stark but finely-executed dramatic climax, and an aftermath that is both deeply affecting and redemptive.

Congratulations also to Jon Bell, who was highly commended for his screenplay, Sweet Spot.

4993_RAKA Award Holding Slides_1280x720px_022Judges’ citation:

This episode from the Redfern Now television series is an excellent example of crisp, taut script-writing and the accumulation of narrative energy. Indigo is an Aboriginal man who has just come out of jail, returning to his wife and children in the ‘fern. The screenplay beautifully conveys his struggle to adjust to daily life and his growing awareness of the dignity and strength of his family.

The 2014 Kate Challis (RAKA) Award was judged by Professor Ken Gelder and Professor Denise Varney (Co-directors of The Australian Centre), Philip Morrissey (Head of Australian Indigenous Studies, The University of Melbourne), Kate Challis (representative of the Smith/Challis family) and Jane Harrison (Playwright and Researcher at RMIT School of Business).

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L-R: Jane Harrison (2002 RAKA award recipient and judge of 2014 RAKA award), Jon Bell (2014 RAKA award highly commended), Ivan Sen (2014 RAKA award winner) and Philip Morrissey (Academic Coordinator of Australian Indigenous Studies in the University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Arts and judge of 2014 RAKA award).

About the Kate Challis (RAKA) Award:

This prestigious award is offered annually to encourage Indigenous creative artists to undertake literary works, paintings, sculptures, craftwork, plays and musical compositions and to assist in advancing the recognition of Aboriginal achievements in these areas. With an approximate value of $20,000, the Kate Challis (RAKA) is awarded in a five-year cycle, each year focusing on a different area of the arts, including creative prose, drama, the visual arts, scriptwriting and poetry.

This award for Indigenous creative artists has been made available through the generosity of Professor Emeritus Bernard Smith, eminent art and cultural historian. The prize was established to honour the memory of his late wife, Kate Challis, who was known in her youth as Ruth Adeney (RAKA is an acronym for the Ruth Adeney Koori Award). In the Pintupi language RAKA means ‘five’ and in the Warlpiri RDAKA means ‘hand’, and both meanings are particularly apt for a prize to be awarded in a cycle of five years to individual artists – novelists, poets, musicians, painters and playwrights – whose ‘hands’ are the basic means of creativity.

IMG_5544

L-R: Elizabeth Heathcote (daughter of the late Professor Emeritus Bernard Smith, and Kate Challis), Ivan Sen (winner of the Kate Challis (RAKA) award for 2014), and Kate Challis (Grand-daughter of Bernard Smith and Kate Challis).

For further information about the Kate Challis (RAKA) Award, visit the Faculty of Arts information page.

Posted in Uncategorized

The View from the Other Side: Researching Australian Advertising in the US

Description

The opportunity to work on the Australian Research Council (ARC) grant “Globalising the Magic System” pushed Professor Susan Smulyan to think (again) about both transnational and advertising history and how we research and tell these stories. The sources for advertising history present challenges as advertising agencies, both like and unlike other businesses, refuse access to sources seen as valuable to, or destructive of, the agency’s “brand.” Oral histories, trade journals, and agency archives present a partial, and sometimes unexpected, history of the influence of American advertising agencies within the Australian industry, as well as influence that goes the other way. They push us to consider (again) the competing claims of the British and American culture industries on the Australian mind.

Susan Smulyan currently serves as the director of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage at Brown. Professor Smulyan is a cultural historian of the United States in the twentieth century with a special interest in advertising, and the author of two books: Selling Radio: The Commercialization of American Broadcasting (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992) and Popular Ideologies: Mass Culture at Mid-Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007) and the co-editor, with Kathleen Franz, of Major Problems In American Popular Culture (Cengage, 2011).

Professor Smulyan is a Partner Investigator on the ARC-funded project "Globalising the Magic System: a History of Advertising Industry Practices in Australia, 1959-1989", which is based in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies.

Professor Smulyan's keynote lecture will be followed by the Symposium "Globalising the Magic System" (12pm - 5pm).

‘Australia in the World’ is a lecture and seminar series that presents international and transnational perspectives on the past. The series highlights the interconnectedness of past worlds and future challenges with speakers from around the country and across the globe.

Supported by The Cultural History of Economies Research hub (CHERHub) and the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies.

When
Thursday, 4 December 2014, 11:00 am

Where
Collaborative Learning Space 1, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

The Olympic Games and Human Rights

Description

Human rights pressures on the Olympic Games have risen dramatically in the last decade. In the 20th century, such pressures were largely limited to ensuring nondiscrimination for athletes; now, demands extend to host country treatment of minorities, labour laws, freedom of the press, and more. Leading human rights organisations such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International now devote substantial resources to researching and publicising human rights issues associated with the Games, fueling media interest and public awareness.

The symposium brings together academics, representatives of sports organisations, and human rights advocates to discuss growing human rights concerns in relation to the Olympic Games. Among the questions to be discussed are:

  • Should the Olympic Games promote human rights, and if so, which rights matter, for whom, and why?

  • Why have the Olympic Games become a target for human rights groups?

  • How has the "Olympic movement" responded to this pressure?

  • What is Australia's responsibility with respect to the human rights issues that affect the Olympics?

  • What can we expect to see in the future?

Presenters include: Barbara Keys, The University of Melbourne, Soyoung Kwon, International Sports Relations Foundation, Kristine Toohey, Griffith University, Nicholas Bequelin, Asia Division, Human Rights Watch, Patrick Kelly, University of Chicago and Helen Lenskyj, University of Toronto

To view the full program, please click here.

When
Saturday, 29 November 2014, 1:30 pm

Where
Jim Potter Room, Old Physics Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Universities and Global Networks

Description

This seminar explores the engagement of Australian academics with international scholarly networks from the early twentieth century. Through two case studies, the involvement of Australian academics in World War I and the contribution of American philanthropists to Australian anthropology, it will examine the influence of these networks on the development of the Australian university.

The Rockefeller Foundation and Australian Anthropology Professor Julia Horne (The University of Sydney) explore the Rockefeller Foundation’s interest in Australian anthropology in the 1920s and 1930s. This presentation examines the structures established for the international movement and exchange of ideas and their impact on power and knowledge as both empowering yet - as studies of cultural imperialism have shown - also encumbered with imperial legacies.

Khaki Common Room - presented by Dr Tamson Pietsch (The University of Sydney).
When war was declared in August 1914, the universities across Australia responded enthusiastically, passing regulations. But the attempt to utilise the expertise of these academic volunteers was, both in Britain and Australia, initially very limited. It was not until the first waves of mustard gas were used to devastating effect on the Western Front in April 1915 that it became evident to them that the war would be fought by chemists and engineers as much as by soldiers and sailors. But where was this expertise to be found? This presentation examines the networks that took Australian academics into the heart of British wartime science, and saw them assume leadership of key fields such as chemistry, mining and physics.

‘Australia in the World’ is a lecture and seminar series that presents international and transnational perspectives on the past. The series highlights the interconnectedness of past worlds and future challenges with speakers from around the country and across the globe. Supported by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies and the History of the University Unit.

When
Thursday, 20 November 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Distance in crises: Queer readings of excess in post-tsunami Japan

Description

In a crisis, we move towards managing negative outcomes, ensuring safety and survival. Needs that are seen to diverge from the immediate concerns of ensuring safety and survival are quashed. Normative configurations of family, of body, of language take precedence. In crises we are asked to be “normal”. The differing needs of differing bodies/families/speakers may be construed as in excess of safety and survival, as excessive, extravagant, or in Japanese as wagamama (selfish). We are propelled to avoid “excess”, and stifle extravagance.

As part of an on-going collaborative project on queer-reading following the March 2011 (311) earthquake and tsunami in Japan, this presentation by Dr Claire Maree will consider how the privileges of distance may allow for a queer reading of excess in post-311 Japan.

Dr Claire Maree is Senior Lecturer in Japanese at the Asia Institute, University of Melbourne. Dr Maree's area of expertise is critical language studies, specifically discourse analysis focusing on critical approaches to language and identity studies, and language education. She is particularly interested in examining the dynamics of gender and sexuality in spoken discourses and contemporary media. Dr Maree is also active in the area of queer theory.

When
Monday, 10 November 2014, 11:30 am

Where
Leigh Scott room, Baillieu Library

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Compressed Capitalism, Globalization, and the Fate of Indian Development

Description

India’s economic turnaround since the 1980s and since 1991 has been widely credited as a result of economic reforms. Gradual and systematic deregulation at home and increased international integration promises even better economic performance. This is only partly true since a good part of India is untouched by economic reforms in any meaningful way, even if official reports of declining poverty are to be believed. The question this seminar poses is why despite envious economic growth rates, India’s development seems elusive. This is a complex issue and could be addressed variously but they are all likely to resort to ‘nation-centric’ explanations.

Anthony take an alternative perspective (still work in progress) to position India in the wider capitalist dynamic of the late twentieth century articulating the national with the global. Late capitalism in India, and for that matter many other developing countries, has meant new technologies, mature capitalists, and a relatively well-developed state. All three cumulatively stand for economic growth, industrialization, urbanization, and some politically negotiated redistribution. However, Anthony will argue that the working of compressed capitalism, that is, primitive accumulation, which is historically complete elsewhere, is an ongoing feature in India and coexists with advanced sectors on a high road to accumulation. However, the dispossession and displacement of people and the persistence of petty commodity production in the context of technology-led, enclave-based economic production add to the development conundrum. The resulting inequality (and polarization) in India in an expanding economy is thus not an anomaly but a reflection of systemic dynamics of contemporary.

When
Wednesday, 12 November 2014, 5:30 pm

Where
Cecil Scutt Collaborative Teaching Space , (Rm 227), Old Arts Building

Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

2014 Kate Challis RAKA Award: Award Screening and Panel Discussion

Description

The Australian Centre is pleased to present the Kate Chalis RAKA (Ruth Adeney Koori Award) Award 2014 for best script for film or television performed in the preceding five years. The $20,000 (approximately) award is offered in a five-year cycle with a different area of the arts being rewarded each year.

The award presentation will be followed with a screening of the winning work and a panel discussion by writers, directors and academics.

This award for Indigenous creative artists has been made available through the generosity of the late Professor Emeritus Bernard Smith, eminent art and cultural historian. The prize was established to honour the memory of his late wife, Kate Challis, who was known in her youth as Ruth Adeney (RAKA is an acronym for the Ruth Adeney Koori Award).

In the Pintupi language RAKA means 'five' and in the Warlpiri RDAKA means 'hand', and both meanings are particularly apt for a prize to be awarded in a cycle of five years to individual artists - novelists, poets, musicians, painters and playwrights - whose 'hands' are the basic means of creativity.

Proudly supported by Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI).

When
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Cinema 1, Australian Centre for Moving Image (ACMI), Federation Square, Flinders Street, Melbourne

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

A Better World Becoming: Placing Critical Indigenous Studies

Description

What is the "place" of Indigenous Studies in the global academy today? How does the specificity of location inform the work of Indigenous and settler scholars, especially in relation to the transnational and trans-Indigenous turns in the discipline? And how do these considerations distinguish "Critical Indigenous Studies" from a more generalist approach? This presentation takes up the challenges and possibilities of localizing the global in the discipline, drawing on the dual contexts of unceded Coast Salish territoriality and Canadian settler-colonialism.

Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born Canadian citizen of the Cherokee Nation. He received his B.A. from the University of Northern Colorado and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Before coming to the University of British Columbia (UBC), he spent ten years as a faculty member in the Department of English at the University of Toronto, where he was also an affiliate of the Aboriginal Studies Program. Daniel currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture.

He is the author of Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History and numerous essays in the field of Indigenous literary studies, as well as co-editor of a number of critical and creative anthologies and journals, including the award-winning Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature. His Indigenous epic fantasy novel, The Way of Thorn and Thunder: The Kynship Chronicles, was released in 2011 by the University of New Mexico Press. His current and forthcoming projects include a cultural history of badgers, a new fantasy novel, a critical monograph on kinship in Indigenous writing, and, with co-editor James H. Cox, the Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature.

He is delighted to be on faculty at UBC and to be learning from and contributing to its vibrant intellectual community, as well as participating fully in the important work of the First Nations Studies Program.

When
Thursday, 6 November 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
Theatre C, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Making an Emotional Body: Christmas in Greccio according to the Vita prima of Francis of Assisi by Thomas of Celano

Description

Barbara Rosenwein elaborated the notion of emotional communities as a way of explaining the affective dimension of social and cultural groups. But how is an ‘emotional community’ born? Exploring a famous case from medieval religious history, Professor Piroska Nagy will test the hypothesis according to which shared emotional events or processes can induce the formation of an emotional or affective community.

One of the best known episodes in the life of saint Francis of Assisi is his celebration of Christmas in 1223 in the little town of Greccio. The episode is told in detail by Thomas of Celano in his first biography written in 1228-29. Later sources on Francis report the episode differently, according to their particular agenda ; and it is also included in the iconographic cycles that depict Francis’s life. Nagy’s aim in this presentation is firstly, to analyse the work of emotions in the creation of communal feeling, through the careful observation of what happened in Greccio according to the first sources, and how they can be understood within the context of Franciscan history ; and secondly, to show how the transformation of the episode in later sources reveals what can be called a Franciscan politics of emotion.

Piroska Nagy is currently professor of medieval history at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), after having taught at the Université Paris I, the Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, Université de Rouen and the Central European University. She is author of Le don des larmes au Moyen Age. Un instrument spirituel en quête d’institution, Ve-XIIIe siècle (Paris: Albin Michel, 2000) and co-author, with Damien Boquet, of Sensible Moyen Age. Une histoire culturelle des émotions et de la vie affective dans l'Occident médiéval, (Paris: Seuil, forthcoming in 2015).

When
Tuesday, 11 November 2014, 6:00 pm

Where
South Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies