We would have become Roman: From Arminius to Herman the German

Description

In classical sources, the Cheruscan military leader Arminius is mentioned as an obstacle to Roman expansion in the early 1st century AD who eventually fell victim to a revolt in his own tribe. Professor Kai Brodersen will explore how the perception of this figure changed to make him the mythical founder of a united German nation in the 19th century.

Professor Brodersen is a distinguished ancient historian, President of the University of Erfurt, and currently resides at the University of Western Australia as the inaugural Margaret Braine Fellow.

His research focuses on Greek and Roman historiography and geography, on ancient inscriptions, oracles and wonder-texts, and on the social and economic history as well as reception studies.

When
Wednesday, 29 April 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Hercus Theatre L105, Physics South Building, Swanston Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Writing history, making race: slave-owners and their stories

Description

How did ideas about race develop across Britain and Australia in the early nineteenth century? Much attention has been paid to the movement for abolition and emancipation, less to the pro-slavers who made sustained efforts, with some considerable success, to defend 'their' property and their interests. In this lecture, Professor Catherine Hall will make the argument that the interventions of British and Caribbean slave-owners in the debates over the slave trade and slavery between the 1770s and the 1830s were critical to the ways in which race came to be understood in Britain. Catherine will explore some connections between these slave-owners and their descendants and the white settlers who made Australia their home in the early nineteenth century.


When
Thursday, 16 April 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Researching Historical Institutional Child Sex Abuse Scandals: The Savile Effect

Description

This seminar will consider ongoing research on historical institutional child sex abuse (ICSA) scandals. Its focus is the multi-institutional scandal triggered by sensational 2012 allegations that British television icon and ‘national treasure’ Sir Jimmy Savile was a ‘prolific sexual predator’ who abused hundreds of young people over six decades across Britain’s key institutions. First, Professor Greer will outline a model for researching ICSA scandals. Second, he will map the Savile Scandal against successive phases of the model and illustrate its continuing amplification as more individuals and institutions become implicated in the perpetration, facilitation, denial and/or cover-up of historical ICSA. Third, he will demonstrate how the Savile Scandal is being politicised in order to advance a variety of ideological and moral agendas, in turn further fuelling the scandal’s amplification. Finally, Professor Greer will ask ‘why now’?

When
Thursday, 30 April 2015, 5:30 pm

Where
Theatre 219, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, 234 Queensberry St, University of Melbourne, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Inhabiting an Ageing Body: Old Age, Fashion, Beauty Culture in 20th Century Britain

Description

What has it felt like to inhabit an ageing body in the past? This lecture analyses the treatment of age in high fashion magazines, older women’s use of make-up, and the grooming habits of Britons who were aged over 60, in order to highlight some of the pleasures of ageing, and to suggest how mid-century fashion and beauty culture operated in the lives of its older consumers. Dr Charlotte Greenhalgh argues that the marginality of the old and the abjection of the ageing body are historically specific dimensions of fashion and beauty culture that were catalysed by the youth-centric nature of mid-1960s popular culture. Older men and women were celebrated in fashion and beauty culture of the preceding decades in ways that have not been recognised, in part because twenty-first-century historians are the inheritors of the particular age-conscious gaze that developed during the 1960s.

This research presents a fresh perspective on the historical dimensions of physiological ageing and underlines the visibility and significance of older people in mid-century British life.

When
Monday, 30 March 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Dulcie Hollyock Room, Ground Floor, Baillieu Library

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Child Refugees & Australian Internationalism: Past, Present, Future

Description

Australia has played a major role internationally in offering humanitarian assistance to child refugees over several decades. This lecture will consider Australia’s relationship to the world through an analysis of the history of assisting, accepting or rejecting child refugees and the institutions and organisations that have played a role in these processes. This knowledge is pertinent as it enables an exploration of the veracity of the general perception that Australians today are more enlightened with respect to humanitarian issues regarding child refugees than those of the past. An analysis of past histories can contextualise and inform current policies and practices and allow us to examine Australia’s current international role on refugee and migration issues more broadly.

‘Australia in the World’ is a lecture and seminar series that presents international and transnational perspectives on the past. The series highlights the interconnectedness of past worlds and future challenges with speakers from around the country and across the globe.

Supported by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies.

When
Tuesday, 24 March 2015, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Religion in the warzone: Driver of conflict, force of peace?

Description

Religious communities see their religion as peaceful and its institutions, beliefs and rituals as serving an important space of healing and consolation. However, many of today’s armed conflicts have a religious component. Religious leaders may be perceived to reinforce boundaries and fuel contention, but at the same time, some are able to bridge these gaps and play a unique brokering role as respected, apolitical authority figures.

How do we understand these contradictions? Does religion itself make a difference and, if so, what does this mean for international players intervening in war-torn contexts? Are we missing something when we conceptualise conflict mediation, state-building or peace-building without taking religion into account? Can peace-oriented forms of religious agency be strengthened, or does foreign support undermine what is perhaps their main resource: the legitimacy of being and perceived as locally grounded and apolitical?

These are among the many questions with which we will engage in this public panel discussion.

When
Thursday, 23 April 2015, 5:30 pm

Where
Woodward Conference Centre, Level 10, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street Carlton VIC 3010

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Economic Elites, Crises and 21st Century Capitalism

Description

21st century capitalism has led to a growing concentration of economic power and political influence in the hands of small elites. Nowadays, economic elites control the bulk of income and wealth; reduce competition; worsen inequality; and make the democratic system very dependent on the corrosive power of money. At the same time, the middle class has become a fragmented and vulnerable segment in society and the traditional working class is largely marginalised. This system also has led to a growing frequency of financial crises followed by costly austerity policies in the global north, although the risks of crisis for the south have not disappeared.

An alternative to the current travails is a new approach of economic democracy that seeks a better distribution of productive assets and opportunities among the population; restores financial and social stability; reduces the power of supra-national financial organisations; gives more voice and participation to the people in the design and monitoring of economic and social policies; and allow individuals, irrespective of their income level and social position, to exploit their talents, abilities and initiatives.

Dr Andrés Solimano is founder and Chairman of the International Center for Globalization and Development, a Professor of Economics at the Economics and Business School at Universidad Mayor in Chile, and author of Economic Elites, Crises and Democracy.

When
Thursday, 26 March 2015, 5:30 pm

Where
Room 219 (Theatre), 234 Queensberry St (Building 263)

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Tiffin Talk: US – Pakistan Relations Under Obama

Description

Historically, US-Pakistan relations have largely followed a clientelistic pattern. The American patron needed a regional broker to contain communism, to play the middleman vis-à-vis China and to offer support in the post-9/11 “global war on terror”. The client needed arms and money to resist India, the neighbour that continues to overdetermine its foreign policy, and to satisfy its military – a state within the state craving for a comfortable life and sophisticated weaponry. This relationship was not based on any other ideological, societal or economic affinity, thereby contributing to make it somewhat shallow and unstable. So long as both countries had a common enemy – USSR – or tried to have common friends – China – and did not look at India in too dissimilar ways, their relationship was supported by at least some common ground. But these common denominators have vanished one after another. First, the fact that India has become closer to the US has indisposed the client. Secondly, China, Pakistan’s “all-weather friend”, has been perceived as a threat to an increasing number of Americans. Third, after the trauma of 9/11, the image of Pakistan has been badly affected not only by a rising, popular Islamophobia, but by the close relations that some Pakistani elements have cultivated with militant islamists.

In this context, the Obama administration and (even more clearly) Senators including John Kerry have tried to shift the emphasis from a security-centered approach to a more civil society-oriented one. But it has been handicapped by the limited power of Pakistan’s civilian rulers and the contradictions of its own agenda, long-term objectives in terms of development being undermined by short-term security-centered goals which has led the Obama administration – possibly under some pressure from the Pentagon – to recognize the Pakistani military as its main interlocutors. Once again, the military-based clientelistic pattern prevailed, the Pakistani army being the United States’ true partner, just as it was before.

When
Thursday, 6 August 2015, 1:00 pm

Where
Seminar Room, Australia India Institute, the University of Melbourne, 147-149 Barry Street Carlton VIC 3053

Booking
Posted in Events, Government

Reliability and Necessary Truth

Description

Uppsala Universitet

The University of Melbourne, Philosophy program, Thursday Seminarst

Presened by Professor Folke Tersman

When
Thursday, 7 May 2015, 4:15 pm

Where
G16 (Jim Potter Room), Old Physics (Building 128)

Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Australia and India: Mapping The Journey 1944-2014, Meg Gurry

Description

2014 was a transformative year in the life of the Australia – India relationship. The reciprocated prime ministerial state visits of Tony Abbott and Narendra Modi brought a frequently unfulfilled connection into sharp focus.

In time for this watershed moment, academic and writer Meg Gurry has pulled together 70 years of diplomatic relations in a book that examines the highest offices of government and goes beyond the popular clichés of cricket and mutual neglect.

From the Nehru-Menzies discord to India’s burgeoning demand for Australian energy, resources and education, Australia and India: Mapping The Journey 1944-2014 highlights the broader regional context of the Australia – India relationship and how this shaped their understanding of each other.

“Meg Gurry’s outstanding record of bilateral relations is essential reading for scholars and policy practitioners alike. The Australia India Institute is honoured to partner with Melbourne University Press in its publication” – Professor Amitabh Mattoo CEO & Foundation Director, Australia India Institute

The book will be launched at this free event. Bookings essential.

When
Thursday, 26 March 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Seminar Room, Australia India Institute, 147-149 Barry Street Carlton VIC 3053

Booking
Posted in Events, Government