The Question of Nineteenth Century Mimesis: Precinema and the Literary Imagination

Description

A rich tradition of art historians and literary critics have often privileged the “window onto the world” view metaphor to understand the focal point of a painting, and to define nineteenth century mimesis. A wide semantic field of metaphors such as “focalization,” “point of view,” “perspective,” “photographic” and later “cinematographic” have insisted on a still observer, and most importantly, on an immobile spectacle in the history of literary and artistic representation at the time of the emergence of nineteenth century realism.

This lecture shall address an alternative aesthetic that runs throughout the long nineteenth century by focusing on the variegated media landscape of pre cinematic entertainment, which includes the optical “philosophical toys” of late eighteenth/early nineteenth century treatises on optics and the expanding attractions of popular culture. Novel theory, therefore, can be recast, by tracking the references to these visual devices in French, British and American fiction. More importantly, print culture through the optical medium of the novel is relevant in this history for it explored, disseminated and contributed to naturalize forms of vision and conceptualization that are coextensive with the emergence of modernity, and which paved the way for the experiments of modernism.

Dr Alberto Gabriele, a graduate of New York University’s Comparative Literature Department is the author of Reading Popular Culture in Victorian Print: Belgravia and Sensationalism (2009).

Supported by the Macgeorge Bequest

IMAGE: Mondo Niovo. Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia. Museo Correr, Gabinetto dei Disegni e delle Stampe.

When
Wednesday, 2 March 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre (Room 107), Old Arts, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Rethinking 21st Century Hispanism from the Periphery

Description

This symposium attempts to start a series of talks on the new horizons of Hispanic in the XXI century, seen from the peripheral perspective studies in Australasia, in a crisis of the humanities and the very concept of traditional hispanism. The symposium, in part, seeks to address one of the core issues of cultural studies: Under what conditions can alter relationships of domination and hegemony between the center and the periphery? And, more specifically, it can be desperiferializar Hispanic studies from a peripheral position?

It is reviewing peripheralizing peninsular Hispanic studies, and evaluate new contributions of Iberian Studies, revaluing while, the peripheral as geographical, cultural and ideological positioning, when questioning the hegemonic optical center and wave expansionist neoliberalism.

In the Spanish countryside, this includes the study of peripheral cultures, not just the so-called missing historical nationalities of the cultural / literary / linguistic canon Castilian (Catalan, Galician, Basque), but other minority languages ​​(Asturias, Aragon, Caló ) and other groups that have traditionally been displaced to different types of periphery, such as the Roma, migrants, exiles, or sexual minorities.

It also means exploring new theoretical frameworks informed by side, hybrid, transversal and transnational critical approaches that reflect the permeability fields and academic disciplines, interdisciplinary and open to different perspectives, which have a place, among others, cultural studies, media, cultural memory, globalization, migration, queer studies, ethnic studies, cultural geography and postcolonial theory.

When
Friday, 4 March 2016, 9:00 am

Where
Room 227, 234 Queensberry St. Room 227, 234 Queensberry St

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

New Perspectives on Italian and Australian Art History

Description

A symposium in honour of Professor Jaynie Anderson

The theme of this symposium – Italian and Australian art history - addresses the broad areas of research undertaken by Professor Jaynie Anderson at the University of Melbourne, while she filled the distinguished roles of third Herald Professor of Art History and foundation Director of the Australian Institute of Art History. The program of speakers is made up of Professor Anderson’s academic and museum colleagues as well as former and current students.

The Keynote Address is being presented by Dr Gerard Vaughan, Director of the National Gallery of Australia and a former Professorial Fellow at the Australian Institute of Art History.

Program includes:

Hilary C Jankelson, PhD Candidate, Art History Program, University of Melbourne
Dr. Antonio González Zarandona, Postdoctoral Associate Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Research Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University
Dr Benjamin Thomas, Rusden Curator, Cultural Collections, Trinity College, University of Melbourne
Dr Diana Hiller, independent art historian, Melbourne
Carl Villis, Conservator of European paintings before 1800, National Gallery of Victoria
Marco Quabba, PhD Candidate, Art History Program, University of Melbourne
Associate Professor Luke Morgan, Art History & Theory, Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture, Monash University
Callum Reid, PhD Candidate, Art History Program, University of Melbourne

When
Friday, 19 February 2016, 9:45 am

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts Building, The University of Melbourne

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Changing the National Gallery of Australia: re-thinking the installations

Description

In late 2015, the Director of the National Gallery of Australia, Dr Gerard Vaughan announced: ‘We have commenced an ambitious project to transform the experience at the NGA. Every time you visit the Gallery there will be new discoveries as we constantly revitalise the galleries dedicated to the permanent collection.’

In this lecture, Dr Vaughan will provide a detailed account of the new rehang, which has included the relocation of the entire Australian collection downstairs. International art, including Jackson Pollock’s famous Blue Poles (1952), has now moved upstairs into refurbished gallery spaces. What does this major ‘re-thinking’ of the permanent display mean for our understanding of the nation’s collection?

This is the keynote address for the New perspectives on Italian and Australian Art History symposium, presented by the Faculty of Arts .

When
Friday, 19 February 2016, 6:15 pm

Where
Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building, Spencer Road, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Cultural Connections and Shared Challenges for Australia and Europe

Description

Europe and Australia have a long history of cultural connections and a shared stake in global challenges of the 21st century, such as human migration and social cohesion.

Professor Russell West-Pavlov, an Australian researcher from the University of Tübingen will discuss in a keynote lecture whether Germany can learn from Australia's approach to migration and multiculturalism.

A panel of researchers and practitioners will explore Australia's cultural connections to Europe in the 21st century and shared challenges we face. This workshop seeks to transcend trite political discussions of Australia as either "European" or "Asian" in its orientation and instead account for the globalised cultural, political and economic relationship between Europe and Australia.

This event will be of interest to those with a personal or professional interest in Europe and there will be an opportunity to discuss the topics with the panelists over refreshments.

When
Monday, 22 February 2016, 9:30 am

Where
South Theatre, Room 224, Old Arts (Building 149)

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Reading and Writing Communities in the Trenches 1914-1918 (France & Italy)

Description

Over 38 years ago, in The Great War and Modern Memory, Paul Fussell examined the literary dimensions of the First World War for British combatants. Fussell was primarily concerned with the officer class, a well-read and articulate elite whose war experience did not necessarily reflect that of other ranks.

Professor Emeritus Lyons' paper does not forget the officer elite, but seeks to broaden the focus to include the reading and writing of ordinary people during the war years. In drawing evidence from French and Italian soldiers, the lecture will also refer to prisoners of war. 
He argues that the trenches constituted a reading community, where soldiers shared similar values, and similar expectations of and appetites for reading. They devoured newspapers while paradoxically maintaining a healthy cynicism towards their exaggerations and falsehoods. They read for information, for recreation and for clues to understand their own involvement in the war. 
At the same time, the trenches were also writing communities in which soldiers plunged into an epistolary frenzy of bulimic proportions. They wrote for similar purposes, in similarly laconic prose and they sometimes wrote, just as they read, in common.

This event is to coincide with the Somewhere in France - Australians on the Western Front exhibition at the Noel Shaw Gallery, Baillieu Library from 11 March - 26 June 2016.

When
Thursday, 17 March 2016, 6:00 pm

Where
Leigh Scott Room, Baillieu Library

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Myth and Emotion in Early Modern Europe

Description

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Greek and Roman classics became increasingly central to the European literary imagination, being referenced, translated, adopted and reshaped by a huge range of authors. In turn, current criticism of early modern literature is ever more concerned with the period’s reception and appropriation of the classical past. Greek and Roman myths held a two­fold appeal for authors: they were 'known' stories, culturally iconic and comfortingly familiar to the educated reader, but readerly knowledge could also be manipulated, and the myths reshaped in emotionally provocative and iconoclastic ways.

This one day symposium at The University of Melbourne will be an investigation into early modern use of classical myths, asking how myth was used both 'privately', to excite emotional effect, and 'publicly', to respond to political, religious, or social events. This symposium will focus on how and why myth was used specifically to excite and manipulate emotional responses in early modern readers and audiences: responses that might run counter to the original, classical focus of such stories.

When
Thursday, 10 March 2016, 9:00 am

Where
Upper East Room, University House, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Understanding Çatalhöyük and the Origins of Settled Life

Description

This talk will summarise 22 years of excavation at the 9000 year-old Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey. The site was first excavated by James Mellaart in the 1960s and recent research has led to many changes in the way the site is understood. The talk will focus on some aspects of this new understanding, particularly with regard to social and political organisation, burial practices and history making. An additional focus will be on how inter-personal violence was managed in a town that contained up to 8000 people. The new understanding of Çatalhöyük is also shown to be relevant for other sites in the Middle East and for the adoption of agriculture and settled life.

When
Friday, 18 March 2016, 7:00 pm

Where
B117 Theatre, Melbourne School of Design, Masson Road

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Serenade on a Blue Guitar: the nature of speeches in Xenophon

Description

This lecture examines the theory behind the ancient Greek historian Xenophon’s use of speeches across the several genres of his literary oeuvre. The lecture also reviews the speeches' functions, before taking a closer look at four case studies: in the "Hellenica", the speeches of Euryptolemus to the Athenians, of Pharnabazus and Agesilaus, and of the Athenians to the Spartans; and in the "Anabasis," the speech of Xenophon to the Greek mercenaries. The lecture argues that Xenophon proves remarkably creative in his employment of speeches, even as he finds inspiration both poetic and historiographical. Rather than simply recounting particulars, the speeches promote narrative intelligibility and assist readers to engage with the account of events, in various ways, including by revealing the abilities (or lack thereof) of those responsible for shaping policy or strategy; or by setting out higher truths, especially relating to character and relationships. This public lecture doubles as the keynote address for the ASCS (Australasian Society for Classical Studies) 37th Annual Conference and is sponsored by the Classical Association of Victoria.

Emily Baragwanath's main area of scholarly interest is the literary techniques employed by Greek historians in their construction of historical narratives.

When
Wednesday, 3 February 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies Annual Conference

Description

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies 37th Annual Conference and General Meeting is a 4-day conference featuring over 120 papers on the literature, history, philosophy, art and archaeology of the Greek and Roman worlds, from the Bronze Age through Classical and Hellenistic Greece, Republican and Imperial Rome, and into Late Antiquity.

There are also papers on the art and archaeology of Egypt, early Christian and Byzantine studies, and reception studies.

This is the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the Annual Conference.

When
Tuesday, 2 February 2016, 9:30 am

Where
Arts Hall and Old Arts Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies