Show me the money! Financing development

Description

A year on from the UN Conference on Finance for Development in Addis Ababa, what does the future of development finance look like? Reforming the international financial architecture, including policies of international institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF, creating policy space for developing countries, and diversifying development funding have been key issues in this process.

This seminar brings together perspectives from development finance experts to examine some of the challenges and opportunities. The main questions addressed by the panel include: What might a ‘new financial architecture’ look like for the development sector in the post-financial crisis period? What does ‘value for money’ mean for development agencies? Is the efficacy of finance as conditionality and regulation changing?

When
Wednesday, 17 August 2016, 5:30 pm

Where
Terrace Lounge, Walter Boas

Booking
  • jflint@humanitarianadvisorygroup.org
Posted in Events, Government

Writing Histories of Gender in Australia and the World

Description

In this roundtable conversation, featuring Mary Tomsic, Kat Ellinghaus, Catherine Kevin and Jacinthe Flore, the panel will discuss the ways in which gender histories have been, and can be, written. Each speaker will reflect on their own practices of writing histories of gender in local, transnational, and global contexts, exploring the key ideas, texts, and archives that they have engaged with. Bringing in examples from their research, these four speakers will together converse about sexuality, racialisation, feminism, science, representation, and writing in Australia and across the world.

Australia in the World is a lecture and seminar series that presents international and transnational perspectives on the past. The series highlights the interconnectedness of past worlds and future challenges with speakers from around the country and across the globe. Supported by the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies.

Kat Ellinghaus is a Monash Fellow in the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies at Monash University.

Jacinthe Flore teaches in the School of Social and Political Sciences at The University of Melbourne and is currently completing her PhD.

Catherine Kevin is a Senior Lecturer in Australian History at Flinders University.

Mary Tomsic is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in History at The University of Melbourne.

When
Thursday, 28 July 2016, 3:00 pm

Where
4th Floor Linkway Room, John Medley Building

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

The Future in Ruins: Thoughts on the Temporality of Infrastructure

Description

In this seminar, Akhil Gupta explores the relationship between infrastructure and temporality by focusing on the future. Infrastructures are particularly good to think about the connection between the present and the future since they are usually long-run investments, often at a large scale, with fairly elongated temporal spans. What insights may we be able to gain by inverting the usual optic, and see infrastructures from the perspective of the future, as "ruins of the future?" Gupta will make an argument about the relatively neglected role of the future in social life, and suggest that infrastructures can help us think anew about futurity, and that the future can help us reimagine infrastructure in the present.

When
Wednesday, 3 August 2016, 5:15 pm

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts Building

Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Indonesia’s future economic prospects

Description

What is the outlook for the Indonesian economy in the midst of global economic pressures, and how is President Joko Widodo's administration tackling the country's key domestic and international economic challenges? Join us for a public lecture by His Excellency Professor Bambang Brodjonegoro, Indonesian Minister of Finance, on Indonesia's Future Economic Prospects.

Professor Mark Considine, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, will open the lecture. Professor Paul Kofman, Dean of the Faculty of Business and Economics, will give a vote of thanks.

Light refreshments will be served from 9.30am

Co-hosted by the Asia Institute, the Melbourne School of Government, and the Centre for Asian Business and Economics

When
Monday, 15 August 2016, 10:00 am

Where
Conference Room, University House @ Woodward, Level 10, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

White Concepts – Ghassan Hage

Description

The Wednesday Lectures 2016 Hosted by Raimond Gaita

It is striking how often people now speak of 'a common humanity' in an ethically inflected register, one that expresses a fellowship of all the peoples of the earth. More often than not, however, we refer to the idea of a common humanity when we lament the failure of its acknowledgment. The forms of that failure are depressingly many: racism, sexism, homophobia, the dehumanization of our enemies, of unrepentant criminals and those who suffer severe and degrading affliction. As often as someone reminds us that 'we are all human beings', someone will reply that to be treated like a human being you must behave like one.

Many people appear now to fear that within twenty years or less national and international politics will be dominated by crises that caused and inflamed by the shameful gap between the rich and the poor nations, aggravated by the effects of climate change. They fear their children and grandchildren will not be protected as they have been from the terrors suffered by most of the peoples of the earth because of impoverishment, natural disasters and the evils inflicted upon them by other human beings. In such circumstances the ideal and even the very idea of a common humanity is likely to seem to have been a foolish illusion.

The Wednesday Lectures 2016 hosted by Raimond Gaita will explore what sustains and what erodes the idea of a common humanity and, more radically, whether it is a useful idea with which to think about the moral, legal and political relations between people and peoples.

Wednesday, 20 July: White Concepts

White Concepts are concepts that claim universality but that are blind to the colonial conditions of production of their universality. The lecture will explore these questions: is 'a common humanity' a white concept and is it useful to even ask this question today?

Ghassan Hage is Future Generation Professor of Anthropology and Social Theory at The University of Melbourne. He has held a number of visiting professorships including at Pierre Bordieus Research Centre and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, American University of Beirut, University of Nanterre - Paris X, University of Copenhagen and Harvard University. His books include: White Nations: Fantasies of White Supremacy in a Multicultural Society; Against Paranoid Nationalism: Searching for Hope in a Shrinking Society; Alter-Politics Critical Anthropology, Political Passion and Radical Imagination and, as editor, Responsibility; Force Movement, Intensity: The Newtonian Imagination in the Humanities and Social Sciences and Waiting.

When
Wednesday, 3 August 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building, University of Melbourne, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Brexit, Trump and the Future of Globalisation

Description

The rise of populist and anti-globalization movements, such as the candidacy of Donald Trump in the U.S. and the recent vote for Brexit in the U.K., have been interpreted as an unprecedented, global threat to the existing liberal economic and political order. Closer examination suggests that these movements are not entirely unprecedented, that they are not global, and that their supporters are motivated by a variety of political and economic discontents. Rather than witnessing an end to globalization, we may be redesigning globalization in a new political environment.

When
Tuesday, 16 August 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Forum Theatre, Arts West Building, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Events, Government

Jokowi’s Foreign Policy and Australia-Indonesia Relations

Description

Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo’s contrasting approach to foreign policy compared to his predecessor Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono stands to reshape Australia-Indonesia ties. The bilateral relationship developed robustly under Yudhoyono, considered by many to be a great friend of Australia. But within Indonesia Yudhoyono incurred criticism as too concerned with Indonesia’s international image, at the expense of taking decisive action against Australia when it transgressed the bounds of friendly behaviour.

In this public lecture, Dr Evi Fitriani will chart President Jokowi’s distinct approach to foreign policy compared to Yudhoyono and outline the implications for Indonesia’s relationship with Australia.

Light refreshments will be served prior to the commencement of the lecture at 6pm. The lecture will be live-streamed via the Indonesia At Melbourne blog (http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/).

When
Monday, 22 August 2016, 5:30 pm

Where
Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1, Sidney Myer Asia Centre

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

China Symposium 2016

Description

China's new model of economic growth: Progress on finance, energy and climate change

Hosted by Professor Mark Considine, Dean, Faculty of Arts

The China Symposium presents the latest research on emerging key topics on the Chinese economy. The past year has been tumultuous in the Chinese economy. China’s stock market correction and currency devaluations in June-August last year rattled global markets, and this jitteriness has continued into 2016. As China is now the second largest economy in the world, persistent turmoil there will have adverse implications for the rest of the world. What are the near- and medium term prospects for the Chinese economy? Does the government have sufficient macroeconomic tools to steer a safe passage through the current transition from an investment-led economy to one based more on innovation on the supply side and consumption on the demand side? Will China be able to deliver on the promises to reduce carbon use and curb greenhouse emissions?

Panel 1: Managing the pivot on growth and macroenconomic wobbles Chaired by Dr Lauren Johnston, University of Melbourne

China’s new model of growth: how is the transition going?
Professor Ross Garnaut AO, University of Melbourne

Fiscal reform, local government debt and the government’s financial outlook
Professor Christine Wong, University of Melbourne

Panel 2: Climate change policy and China’s energy transition Chaired by Professor Ross Garnaut AO, The University of Melbourne
China’s objectives and ambitions for meeting the emission reduction targets
Mr Fergus Green, London School of Economics
Nicholas Stern

Transforming China into a low-carbon economy
Professor Zhong Xiang Zhang, Tianjin University

The steel industry transformation: issues, challenges and prospects
Associate Professor Ligang Song, Australian National University

Guests are invited to a reception at the conclusion of the Symposium in the theatre foyer.

When
Wednesday, 20 July 2016, 5:00 pm

Where
Theatre B117, Melbourne School of Design, Masson Road

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Australia and Indonesia: When neighbours become good friends

Description

The number of students studying Indonesian in Australia has declined in recent decades, yet Australia remains the country outside Indonesia with the largest number of students studying Indonesian at both schools and universities.

Recognising the significance of the relationship between Indonesia and Australia, and the importance of cross-cultural understanding between these two countries, Pak Gusrizal has initiated several programs to support Australian teachers of Indonesian.

In this presentation, Pak Gusrizal will discuss his “Cultural Diplomacy” program in which engagement is the key instrument to develop cultural insights and language proficiency for sound cross-cultural understanding between Australia and Indonesia. In this program he pays particular attention to the West Sumatra region of Indonesia. Cultural diplomacy and people-to-people contact are seen as the way forward to familiarise our future generations with languages and cultures, and to equip them with important skills both now and in the future.

When
Friday, 29 July 2016, 4:00 pm

Where
Room 321, Level 3, Sidney Myer Asia Centre

Posted in Asia Institute, Events

China Symposium 2016 China’s new model of economic growth: Progress on finance, energy and climate change

Description

The China Symposium presents the latest research on emerging key topics on the Chinese economy. The past year has been tumultuous in the Chinese economy. China’s stock market correction and currency devaluations in June-August last year rattled global markets, and this jitteriness has continued into 2016. As China is now the second largest economy in the world, persistent turmoil there will have adverse implications for the rest of the world. What are the near- and medium term prospects for the Chinese economy? Does the government have sufficient macroeconomic tools to steer a safe passage through the current transition from an investment-led economy to one based more on innovation on the supply side and consumption on the demand side? Will China be able to deliver on the promises to reduce carbon use and curb greenhouse emissions?

Panel 1:
Managing the pivot on growth and macroenconomic wobbles
Dr Lauren Johnston, University of Melbourne

China’s new model of growth: how is the transition going?
Professor Ross Garnaut AO, University of Melbourne

Fiscal reform, local government debt and the government’s financial outlook
Professor Christine Wong, University of Melbourne

Panel 2:
Climate change policy and China’s energy transition
Professor Ross Garnaut AO, The University of Melbourne

China’s objectives and ambitions for meeting the emission reduction targets
Mr Fergus Green, London School of Economics
Nicholas Stern

Transforming China into a low-carbon economy
Professor Zhong Xiang Zhang, Tianjin University

The steel industry transformation: issues, challenges and prospects
Associate Professor Ligang Song, Australian National University

Guests are invited to a reception at the conclusion of the Symposium in the theatre foyer.

When
Wednesday, 20 July 2016, 5:00 pm

Where
Theatre B117, Melbourne School of Design, Masson Road

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events