Melbourne Band Map – A Primary Node

Description

In the spirit of the Seattle Band Map and the US Map of Jazz, we wondered what a map of Australia’s Musical Capital would look like? What if we started with Adam Simmons, one of Melbourne’s hardest working musos? What would it tell us about Melbourne music, what would it tell us about Adam?

What does a map of Melbourne jazz, world, pop, experimental and improvised music look like? Where will you be in the map?

During November 2015 Adam will be playing duets with over 100 of Australia’s leading musicians and artists at Conduit Gallery Fitzroy.

During the month-long event he will be collaborating with the University of Melbourne to create a crowdsourced visual map of who he has worked with.

This unique event will bring to light the intricate web of musicians that are at the heart of the Melbourne music scene.

You will want to be part of the map that will tell a story about Melbourne’s music and artistic history.

When
Sunday, 1 November 2015, 5:00 pm

Where
Conduit Gallery, 83 Brunswick St, Fitzroy VIC 3065

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Freedom from Information – Australia’s War on Transparency

Description

2015 A.N. Smith Lecture in Journalism

Can we really handle the truth?

There is an assumption against transparency among governments and institutions in contemporary Australia and they are too often aided and abetted by the media industry, trading away its freedom to investigate for short term gains. How much truth do we think we are entitled to?

Walkley Award winning journalist Sarah Ferguson, whose documentary series on the Rudd/Gillard years The Killing Season made waves earlier this year, will present the 2015 A.N. Smith lecture in Journalism. Ferguson will outline how Australia’s institutions are failing in their responsibilities to the public, and how the Australian media industry is complicit in a war on transparency.

The first annual A.N. Smith Lecture in Journalism was held in 1938. The lecture is presented by a leading authority on some important aspect of journalism.

When
Wednesday, 7 October 2015, 7:00 pm

Where
Carillo Gantner Theatre, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Art Curatorship Now & Beyond

Description

This symposium celebrates 25 years since art curatorship was first offered as a degree at The University of Melbourne. As well as recognising this legacy through reflection and debate, the symposium program provides the opportunity to construct a new roadmap for contemporary curating through dynamic interaction and the exploration of new ideas. Engage with professional colleagues from a range of Australia’s leading art museums and visual arts institutions to examine past, present and future directions in art curatorial research, teaching, and the career development of visual arts professionals. The symposium welcomes academic colleagues, professional peers, art curatorship students and graduates of the course, as well as Arts Faculty alumni and members of the wider public.

Participants: Julie Banks, Thomas Berghuis, Roger Butler, Naomi Cass, Rebecca Coates, Dagmar Eichberger, Alex Ellem, Charles Green, Paul Gurney, Alison Inglis, Shaune Lakin, Julie Lomax, Susan Lowish, Christopher Marshall, Caroline Moes, Fiona Moore, Tara McDowell, Pippa Milne, Felicity Strong, Mikala Tai, Miya Tokumitsu, Carol Yinghua Lu and many more.

When
Friday, 18 September 2015, 9:45 am

Where
Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Art Curatorship Now and Beyond: Keynote Lecture

Description

This lecture will discuss the issues and challenges Carol Yinghua Lu has encountered surrounding contemporary independent curatorship in a global environment. How can curatorship engage global issues in a local context whilst recognising diversity?

Carol Yinghua Lu lives and works in Beijing. She is the contributing editor for Frieze and is on the advisory board for The Exhibitionist. Lu was on the jury for the Golden Lion Award in 2011 Venice Biennale and the co-artistic director of 2012 Gwangju Biennale

When
Friday, 18 September 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
David P. Derham Theatre - GM15, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Curating as a Profession

Description

What does it mean to build a career as a professional curator working in the expanded field of contemporary art, art history and practices of art? Often discussions focus on defining the role of curator, but less attention has been given to curating as a profession.

The Master of Art Curatorship at the University of Melbourne offers a range of specialisations, including collection management, event development, exhibition management, exhibition interpretation, and conservation. But what about the impetus of curating in seeking new social relations and motivating people, spaces and objects to be reinterpreted at different times, locations, and contexts? What are the tools and skills that make curating an effective profession in the expanded field of contemporary art? Instead of asking "what do curators do?” – perhaps we should ask, "how do we teach curating?”

Dr. Thomas Berghuis is Deputy Director of the Australian Centre for Asian Art

When
Thursday, 17 September 2015, 6:30 pm

Where
Carillo Gantner Theatre, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, Swanston Street, The University of Melbourne, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Commemorating The Great War in a Community Museum

Description

This lecture will present a community-engagement project which was focused on the development of the museological skills of volunteers running the LifeCare retirement village's War Museum. University of Melbourne conservation students have worked with residents and volunteers for the past 5 years to help them establish good museum practices. The students' appreciation of their positive contribution to stakeholder engagement, community museums and commemorative displays deepened as residents demonstrated the links between their wartime experiences and the collection. With increasing professional activity the museum's public profile expanded, inducing more residents to contribute more time, objects and stories to the museum.

The project's beneficial outcomes—educational, personal and community—demonstrate that people learn by solving real problems and can succeed at challenging tasks when the process means something to them, personally.

Sophie Lewincamp has been the project manager for the RSL LifeCare Community Engagement and Conservation Project since 2012 collaborating with CCMC students & alumni, Australian War Memorial staff and RSL LifeCare Veterans. In 2012, the project was awarded The University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor’s Staff Engagement Grant.

When
Wednesday, 14 October 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building,, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Melbourne Writers Festival – Australian Centre and Faculty of Arts Literary Awards 2015

As part of the 2015 Melbourne Writers Festival, on Saturday 22 August a suite of literary awards supported by the Australian Centre and Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne were awarded to students and emerging and established writers in the fields of creative, history, poetry and life writing.

The six national literary awards were presented to seven winners from across Australia and New Zealand.

The winners are:

Affirm Press Creative Writing Prize
Professional editorial assistance and writing space for best adult genres manuscript open to University of Melbourne students and graduates.

Presented by Martin Hughes, Publishing Director at Affirm Press.
Winner: Tobias McCorkell for draft manuscript Barely Anything. 

Tobias McConkellCitation: Congratulations to Tobias McCorkell, winner of the 2015 Affirm Press Creative Writing Prize for an excerpt from his novel Barely Anything. Set in Melbourne, this work follows the lives of four twenty-something’s through the parties, bars, clubs and city streets of a new millennium. Tobias’s work has been praised for its strong narrative voice and the ambition of his multidimensional story, as it explores the tensions between privilege, sex and boredom on both sides of the Yarra River. Tobias is currently completing a PhD in contemporary Australian Literature at The University of Melbourne.

The Wesley Michel Wright Prize
$4,000 for poetry in English by an Australian poet.

Presented by Associate Professor Justin Clemens, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne.
Winner: David Stavanger for extracts from The Special.

Citation: David Stavanger’s poems are direct, immediate, funny. Yet a bonfire of loss is constantly threatening to burst from his careful tinder of familiar or domestic moments. Even the brief, understated poems project an epic sweep and violence: any reader could easily fall victim to this guerrilla lyricism. In poems such as ‘optimism,’ each line adds another layer of terror to the last, while the prose poetry of ‘nobody whistles in the dark’ builds to a noir climax by shifting images with a staccato syntax. Sentences start like they’re straightforward, then suddenly swerve to the surreal and back again. In Stavanger’s work, postures cut themselves down in the very gesture with which they are made, just as mouths end up ‘full of fingerprints/bullets without a hole.’ An utterly unique voice, nobody walks the ‘dead dog to the cemetery’ like David Stavanger.

Highly Commended: L.K. Holt, extracts from Keeps

With a density of figure and allusion rarely paralleled in contemporary Australian poetry, L.K. Holt creates poems that are at once highly personal and rigorously theoretical, at once ekphrastic and existential. She is capable of describing a shark with the same intricate fascination as she does an intimate moment or a famous sculpture, encounters which rouse her ‘to blood-belting/action,’ that of writing itself.

Highly Commended: Sarah Holland-Batt, extracts from The Hazards

Sarah Holland-Batt’s intense lyrics describe the natural world with sharp vivacity, as they simultaneously incise the presence of loss and death. With a sensitive and subtle ear, she can invoke Bishop or Heaney or Hughes or Larkin or Lowell, while always tending towards her own singular vision. ‘But this morning I saw a young rabbit/hunched in brush and shadow,’ she writes, ‘It had caught the disease/we brought here for it…’ The beauty and violence of the natural world entwines with an emotional universe.

The Dinny O’Hearn Fellowship
$5,000 and residency at The Australian Centre for an emerging Australian writer of fiction, poetry or drama.

Presented by Professor Ken Gelder, Director, The Australian Centre.
Winner: Anupama Pilbrow for her suite of poems titled The Ravage Space.

IMG_7325Citation: The judges agreed that these poems were both compelling and of a remarkably high standard. They spoke to an Australian/South Asian diaspora, to street life and the life of things and people, of relationships, past lives and futures. The poems were formally and linguistically fascinating, mixing English with Hindi and Marathi phrases with the aim – as some excellent accompanying notes put it – of ‘reframing pluralism as the cultural norm’. This is inventive, thoughtful and vibrant work. The judges look forward to the publication of this collection and are certain it will be met with critical acclaim.

The Ernest Scott Prize
$7,500 (each) awarded for a work in Australian, New Zealand or colonial history.

Presented by Professor Kate Darian-Smith, Head of History, Faculty of Arts.
Joint Winners: Alan Atkinson for The Europeans in Australia: Volume 3: Nation, and
Tom Brooking for Richard Seddon, King of God’s Own: The Life and Times of New Zealand’s Longest-Serving Prime Minister.

Citation (Alan Atkinson): In the third and final volume of his history of The Europeans in Australia, Alan Atkinson pursues his inquiry into relationships between community and communication in Australia during the period between 1870 and the end of the First World War. The idea of ‘Australia’ nourished the hopes of those who judged their progress in moral or spiritual terms as it took shape in ways political, especially in the process of federation.

Showing how maps made people think differently, reading lessons changed accents and telephones connected voices, Atkinson’s work is akin to a ‘bottom up’ Australian version of Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities. He enables us to sense change through evolving notions of manhood and womanhood, and moves nimbly between colonies and schools, families and parliaments, Aboriginal-White frontier violence and urban clubs. All the while, he says, Australians were feeling their way towards a marriage between continental nationhood and moral purpose. Nation is organised mostly by considering Australians wondering and striving in relation to Enlightenment ideals in their distinctive circumstances. Atkinson turns to lead figures in this wrestle, such as Alfred Deakin and Rose Scott, and joins them with glimpses of Australia as seen from regional newspapers, medical pamphlets, and diverse other sources.  His great skill in exposing and reflecting on different forms of Australian conversation is to invite us into the realms by which Australians understood themselves and the times in which they lived. He achieves intimacy with his many characters by giving them their voices and by standing, as an author, in a close and sympathetic listening position. The result is a rich, and often audible, vista of humanity.


Citation (Tom Brooking): 
Tom Brooking has produced a handsome, richly illustrated biography of Richard Seddon, New Zealand’s longest-serving Prime Minister (1893-1906) and arguably the country’s greatest leader. As Brooking shows in detail, Seddon was a defining leader through times of policy reform that did much to define the social contract in New Zealand. He was not always the primary agent of change, and followed slowly rather than led the move towards the vote for women, but his dedication to reducing inequality and building a robust role for the state in this ongoing task was unstinting. It extended to important infrastructure such as the railways, institutions such as the Bank of New Zealand, and polices ranging from pensions and housing to energy and environmental protection.

One of Seddon’s great strengths was his preparedness to strike out on foot through the electorates, and engage with those who would seek to speak with him. He was a big man, and through the pages of this big, meticulously-researched book (including a rich, 36-page Bibliography) we feel his strides. The strong connection with people underpinned his transformation into popular and even populist leader. As Brooking shows, he was always solidly grounded too, in his formative experiences of growing up in a rugged masculine environment and cutting his political teeth by championing miners’ rights (while developing an enduring hostility to Chinese immigrants) and better education, roads and services for the west coast.

Seddon was known for his dedication to family, and a talking point was his appointment of his daughter Mary Stuart as his private secretary. As Brooking makes clear, his wife Louisa, Mary Stuart and five other daughters, played quiet but important roles in relation to women’s suffrage and other issues.

Brooking’s book-ends, his reflections on how Seddon measures up against others for the claim to being New Zealand’s greatest Prime Minister, are perhaps unnecessary. This is a biography fit for the ‘King of God’s Own’

The Peter Blazey Fellowship
$15,000 to further a work in progress in biography, autobiography or life-writing.

Presented by Professor Ken Gelder, Director, The Australian Centre.
Winner: Julia Leigh for Avalanche

Citation: Julia Leigh’s submission to the Blazey Fellowship was an extract from her forthcoming autobiographical work Avalanche, a frank, touching and beautifully written account of her experiences with IVF. The extract chronicles her decision to undergo treatment, built around her Need for what she calls ‘Sweet dark purpose’. It folds a sophisticated and sometimes clinically detached view of the effects of medical processes on women into an intensely personal narrative to do with loss, hope and longing. The extract is a series of exquisitely constructed scenes that immerse the reader into the choices she makes and the challenges she faces.

The Kate Challis RAKA Award
$20,000 for the best book of poems by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Presented by Philip Morrissey, Head of Australian Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts.
Winner: Lionel G Fogarty for Mogwie-Idan: Stories of the Land

LionelCitation: Lionel Fogarty’s book of poetry Mogwie-Idan: Stories of the Land stood out to the judges for the sheer power of the poetry from first to last page. This is the poetry of a mature, confident poet, rich and inventive with language and viewpoint.  It is a wide-ranging literary intervention into Australian history and culture. The poetry ranges, in hybrid style, across trans-historical themes in assertive, provocative, defiant, satirical and brilliant verse that gives readers the sense that they will come back to the poems time and time again, and there will still be more to decipher and understand. There is highly inventive twisting and tangling of words such as in the line: ‘Even bulldogs British the law’ condenses colonization into one succinct line. The poems are a radical critique of settlement – ‘you’, ‘he’, ‘she’, ‘white explorers’ and ‘untribal man singing songs’ – but are also addressed, perhaps too hopefully, ‘to all open-minded people’.

Thank you and acknowledgements were made to Donors of the prizes and fellowships, Arts Prizes office and staff, School of Culture and Communication and Arts Faculty for supporting the event at the Melbourne Writers Festival.

Posted in Uncategorized

Myanmar’s Transition Amid International Economic Sanctions

Description

After two decades of military rule, in 2011, Myanmar (Burma) held elections and moved towards an apparently more 'democratic' regime, beginning a period of economic reforms and some political liberalisation. Western policymakers and Myanmar's democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi have all claimed that Western economic sanctions "worked" to bring about this change. But, drawing on findings from his forthcoming book, Societies Under Siege: Exploring How International Economic Sanctions (Do Not) Work, Lee Jones argues that sanctions were marginal or even counter-productive.

Lee Jones sits on the editorial board of Palgrave’s book series, Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy, and is a member of the ESRC’s peer review college. Lee has advised government agencies and civil society groups from a wide range of countries including Australia, Britain, Denmark, France, Myanmar and Timor-Leste.

When
Tuesday, 15 September 2015, 6:00 pm

Where
Harold Woodruff Theatre, Microbiology, Building 184, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Found in Translation: How does Italy Travel?

Description

Explore what it is that continues to attract Australian writers and artists to Italy in these contemporary times and which Italy is portrayed in their works. Offering a new horizon of expectations concerning Italy, and thus of a new kind of approach to it, this lecture analyses current trends in Australian intellectuals’ attitude towards this country. The image of Italy that emerges from the works of the authors Peter Robb, Robert Dessaix and Paul Carter is different from the one that prevailed in the writings deriving from the previous tradition of Australian travel to Italy, and offers a compelling picture of Italy’s contemporary situation. Parts of Italy are described as being disfigured by savage anthropization, decadence and decay are highlighted, and the country is represented as being at the mercy of criminal organizations. Nonetheless, throughout their writings these contemporary Australian writers keep ‘going back’ to a country which, in spite of its decline, real or alleged, still represents for them a place that stimulates thought and imagination. Italy, as an idea of civility, strongly persists, as in the works by Paul Carter.

The second part of the lecture will be in discussion with Professor Paul Carter who, referring to his works inspired by Italy, will illustrate what is ‘found’ in translation when Australian authors write about Italy.

Dr Roberta Trapè holds a PhD in English and American Studies from the University of Florence.

Supported by the Macgeorge Bequest.

IMAGE: Grand Canal: Looking South West - Canaletto, c.1738

When
Thursday, 17 September 2015, 6:30 pm

Where
Italian Cultural Institute of Melbourne, South Yarra, 233 Domain Road, South Yarra

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Scenes from Daily Life on Athenian Vases

Description

Greek painted vases from Athens are our richest and most complex source of images from ancient Greece. Traditionally, they have been grouped together as either scenes of myth or pictures of daily life with most of the scholarly attention being paid to myth.

This lecture will examine not only the different types of subjects connected with daily life that are illustrated on these vases, but will also note subjects not found, such as scenes of cooking or cleaning, activities probably left to slaves.

Scholars are currently divided as to how great the documentary value of vase-paintings is for determining the reality of ancient life in Athens, and the question of whether the vase-paintings are accurate reflections of different aspects of ancient life or pure fantasy has not been answered definitively. Indeed, often multiple interpretations for the same type of scene have been put forth. This lecture will shed light on this question and attempt to solve the quandary.

John Oakley is Chancellor Professor and Forrest D. Murden Jr. Professor in the Department of Classical Studies at the College of William and Mary in Virginia, USA.

IMAGE: Musical scene with three women. Side A of a red-figure amphora, Walters Art Museum. Niobid Painter, 470-450 BC

When
Wednesday, 16 September 2015, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre A, Elisabeth Murdoch Building, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies