Technologies/Histories Symposium

Description

Co-hosted by the Transformative Technologies Research Unit (University of Melbourne) & Flinders University, this symposium examines developments in various technologies and their relationship to history.

The keynote speaker for the event is Lori Emerson, Associate Professor with a split appointment in the Department of English and the Intermedia Arts, Writing, and Performance Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is also Director of the Media Archaeology Lab and writes about media poetics as well as the history of computing, media archaeology, media theory, and digital humanities. Lori Emerson will discuss her current book project titled Other Network – a network archaeology of the history of telecommunications networks that pre-date the Internet or exist outside of the Internet.

Session titles include:

  • History, Materiality and Digital (Re)Imaging
  • Being Digital in the 1980s
  • Media Archaeology: the Technological Present and its Histories
When
Thursday, 2 June 2016, 10:00 am

Where
G21 , Alan Gilbert Theatre 1, Grattan Street

Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Art, Ethics and Indigeneity

Description

A full day symposium to be held as part of the National Reconciliation Week program at the VCA and MCM.

This symposium invites Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers working across the field of Indigenous arts and culture to address some of the key issues when working with Indigenous people, places and communities. It will address the importance of understanding and following protocols and will showcase some of the innovative research being undertaken by Indigenous scholars and artists, and by non-Indigenous researchers working with Indigenous people, places and communities.

Guest speakers include:
Richard Frankland
Genevieve Grieves
Ngardarb Riches
Professor Brian Martin
Janis Koolmatrie
Lilly Brown
Dr Sally Treloyn
Rona (Googninda) Charles (Ngarinyin, Nyigina)
Wilton Foster OAM (Anangu)
Dr Susan Lowish with the Ara Irititja project team
Dr Sandy O’Sullivan
Professor Estelle Barrett and
Philip Morrissey.

IMAGE: Richard Frankland - photograph of graffiti by Koorie youth, Healesville

When
Wednesday, 1 June 2016, 9:00 am

Where
Federation Hall, Grant St, Southbank, Grant Street

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Old Time Accomplices: Mentors and Mentees conference

Description

Old Time Accomplices: Mentors and Mentees is a three day conference that creates a space for the interdisciplinary exploration of the idea of mentoring.

The School of Languages and Linguistics at The University of Melbourne supported by the international literary association SAToR (Société d'Analyse de la Topique Romanesque) presents this 3-day conference we wish to explore the mentor-mentee relationship in an interdisciplinary context. The conference will explore the theme and the practice of mentoring in literature, history, art, performing arts, social sciences, and in the professional world.

The conference will address the following themes:

  • Famous mentors and mentees
  • Fictional mentors and mentees and/or the theme of mentoring in literature, music and performing arts
  • The evolution of the mentor-mentee relationship
  • Differences and similarities in the relationships between mentor-mentee, master-disciple, sponsor-sponsored, and master-apprentice
  • Gender and mentoring
  • Power and mentoring
  • Mentoring and/for children
  • Mentoring, creative ownership and intellectual property
  • Rituals and ceremonies
  • Access or elitism?
  • Mentoring in context: differences across disciplines/workplace environments

The conference will include specific targeted workshops and mentoring sessions for graduate students and a prefix graduate day workshop on Friday 26 August 2016.

Conference convenors

Professor Véronique Duché-Gavet, Dr Gregoria Manzin, Professor Lesley Stirling

Keynote speakers include:

  • Dr Jennifer de Vries, author of Mentoring for Change (2011)
  • Professor Madeleine Jeay, Macmaster University (Canada), a specialist of French medieval literature

More information

For more information on the conference programme, speakers, abstracts and accommodation, please visit the conference website.

When
Thursday, 25 August 2016, 9:15 am

Where
Macmahon Ball Theatre, Old Arts (Building 149)

Booking
  • veronique.duche@unimelb.edu.au
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Entretien avec Marie Darrieussecq – In Conversation with Marie Darrieussecq (conducted in French)

Description

Internationally celebrated French author Marie Darrieussecq is in Australia to promote her 16th and second last novel, Il faut beaucoup aimer les hommes, which won the 2013 Prix Médicis and the Prix des prix littéraires. Men, the English translation, has just been released this autumn by Text Publishing.

Since the publication of her "fascinating and original" (The New York Times Book Review) first novel, Truismes (Pig Tails) ,which was published in thirty-four countries, she has has been nominated for many prestigious awards and gained tremendous critical and commercial successes.

Five novels have been translated into English, including Bref séjour parmi les vivants, Tom est mort and Clèves.

When
Tuesday, 24 May 2016, 1:00 pm

Where
Middle Theatre, Room 106, Babel

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Entretien avec Nicolas Fargues – In Conversation with Nicholas Fargues (conducted in French)

Description

Renowned novelist Nicolas Fargues is the 2016 French writer-in-residence at Randell Cottage Writers Trust (Wellington, New Zealand).

He's written ten books, including I was behind you, published by Pushkin Press, London and translated into fifteen different languages.

His latest novel Au pays du P'tit, has been nominated for the Prix Goncourt in 2015.

When
Tuesday, 24 May 2016, 3:15 pm

Where
Room 506, Babel

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Australian Identity Through Cultural Materials Conservation

Description

The material world surrounds us: feeding our senses, our imagination and our curiosity. We inherit and we create cultural and scientific records that help us make sense of this world. Cultural materials conservation employs materiality to understand and protect these records, integrating knowledge acquired in the sciences and the humanities with that developed by cultural knowledge holders and practitioners. Conservation studies provide unique understandings of how cultural knowledge, disciplinary knowledge and the materiality that surrounds us, can come together to shed light on significant questions of knowledge and identity.

In this lecture Professor Robyn Sloggett explores the valuable contribution that cultural materials conservation makes to the continual quest to understand our place in the world. She examines how conservation studies expand our understanding of Australia's diverse epistemological traditions and their significance in contemporary Australian life and expand opportunities for economic innovation, referencing Australia's rich, ancient and continuous Indigenous knowledge, the disciplinary genealogy of the Western history of ideas, and our place in the Asia-Pacific region.

Her lecture concludes by addressing the question: Without a national strategy for the preservation of its cultural and scientific record is Australia risking identity amnesia?

Professor Robyn Sloggett AM is Director of the Grimwade Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation at the University of Melbourne.

When
Thursday, 16 June 2016, 6:00 pm

Where
Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Public Lecture Theatre

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Marie Darrieussecq: In Conversation

Description

‘We have to love men a lot. A lot, a lot. Love them a lot in order to love them. Otherwise it’s impossible; we couldn't bear them.’ Marguerite Duras

Internationally-celebrated French author, Marie Darrieussecq, joins us in conversation to discuss her latest novel Men, a narrative of passion, movie making and otherness. Men revisits the story of Solange, the provincial teenager whose explorations of nascent sexual desire first appeared in All the Way.

Marie also discusses her narrative tactics and techniques, the pushing of prose to its poetic limits (and beyond), her journalism, and working for Charlie Hebdo. A reading of Men will be offered in French and English.

Marie Darrieussecq was born in 1969 in Bayonne, France. Her debut novel, Pig Tales, was published in thirty-four countries and became the most popular first novel in France since the 1950s.

When
Wednesday, 25 May 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
4th Floor, Linkway, John Medley , Gate 10, Grattan Street, Parkville

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Banality of Expressions: Language and politics in post-New Order Indonesia

Description

During the New Order's rule, bahasa Indonesia was overly "inflated" by the overwhelming presence of euphemism (or the practice of softening expressions deemed to be sensitive in order to hide the truth; e.g., diamankan for 'being arrested', oknum for officials committing crimes, relokasi for ‘forced eviction’, etc.). The purpose to keep the positive image of the ruling power which had continuously been challenged due to its systemic violations of citizen’s civil rights.

Dr. Manneke Budiman will relate this linguistic phenomenon with the changing scene of Indonesian politics in the last 15 years or so, arguing that multiple factors intersect in the emergence of such a phenomenon, in response to both political crisis and awakening in post-New Order Indonesia.

Dr. Manneke Budiman is Senior lecturer and Vice-Dean for Academic, Research, and Student Affairs in the Faculty of Humanities, University of Indonesia.

Bookings not required.

When
Thursday, 14 July 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Theatre D, Old Arts

Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Science and Truth: the legacy of the Cahiers pour l’Analyse

Description

'Science and Truth: the legacy of the Cahiers pour l'Analyse' is a masterclass for current graduate students examining the most ambitious and radical collective project to emerge from French structuralism, and is presented as part of the conference 1966 and All That.

Alain Badiou’s essay "Mark and Lack," and Jacques-Alain Miller’s "Suture” and "Action of the Structure," are fundamental texts of the Cahiers pour l’Analyse, and among the better known. Attendees not yet familiar with them are advised to read them prior to the masterclass. Brief summaries of the arguments contained in them will be delivered at the outset as part of a general summary of the CpA project.

However, the main focus of the masterclass will be on the following three articles:

- Jean-Claude Milner, "Point of the Signifier"
- Alain Grosrichard, "An Eighteenth Century Psychological Experiment" (Including Appendix by Mérian)
- François Regnault, "Dialectic of Epistemologies"

Attendees not familiar with Plato's Sophist or Parmenides may want to consult summaries of these dialogues prior to engaging with Milner and Regnault (respectively.) We will struggle with these texts together in an attempt to affirm the proposition that the legacy of the Cahiers pour l'Analyse is hardly exhausted by the disagreement between Miller and Badiou. More specifically, we will join the young normaliens in their effort to develop a plausible account of what it means to know.

Admission is free. Registration is required.

Knox Peden is an ARC DECRA Research Fellow in the School of Philosophy at the Research School of the Social Sciences, Australian National University. He received his PhD from UC Berkeley in 2009, where he specialized in modern European intellectual history. From 2011 to 2014 he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for the History of European Discourses at the University of Queensland. He is the co-editor of the first systematic presentation and assessment of the groundbreaking journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966-69), in the two-volume work Concept and Form (Verso, 2012). His first book Spinoza Contra Phenomenology (Stanford, 2014) is an account of the resurgence of enthusiasm for Spinoza’s philosophy in twentieth-century France. At present, he is completing a survey titled French Philosophy Today: A Historical Introduction, which Bloomsbury will publish in 2016. His DECRA research considers the historical relationship between secularism and philosophy by way of a comparative investigation of several “Spinoza Controversies” from the early modern period to the present.

When
Friday, 10 June 2016, 11:00 am

Where
Fourth Floor Linkway, John Medley (Building 191)

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Nation, Neighbours & Humanity: Destroyed & Recovered in War & Violence

Description

How does love for home/nation become the site for intolerance and provoke violence against neighbours deemed 'betrayers' and Other? What precipitates the expression of this hate? Is shared humanity possible among erstwhile perpetrators and victims? What do we have to gain by engaging a different grammar of humanity in South Asia? Through the method of oral history, Professor Saikia probes the memories of violence of soldiers and civilians, men and women, perpetrators and victims of the 1971 war. A common and shared memory of this variety was the humbling experience of participating in a destructive war for nation-building/breaking. Particularly, perpetrators’ private memories open the space for situating the divergent desires that clashed with one another for and against the national imagination. Today, the nations of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh refuse to acknowledge the 'disastrous' memories of 1971 because it unsettles state histories. For perpetrators, however, the memories of violence are critical for understanding the meaning of sacrifice for nation, as well raising for some the question of ethical responsibility to victims.

In this talk, Professor Yasmin Saikia explores the possibilities for remembering the traumatic events of 1971 war differently, and the ways in which such remembering might signal the way forward to new ways of imagining the subcontinental human condition

Professor Yasmin Saikia is Hardt-Nickachos Chair in Peace Studies at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict and a Professor of History in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at Arizona State University.

When
Thursday, 26 May 2016, 6:45 pm

Where
Basement Theatre 117, Melbourne School of Design, Masson Road

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies