Superhero Identities Symposium

Description

It is hard to imagine a time when superheroes have been more pervasive in popular culture. As one of our most beloved folkloric traditions these costume-clad adventurers have become a means to negotiate and articulate identities in response to fictional heroes. From big screen heroes to lesser-known comic book vigilantes and real-life costumed heroes, this special two-day symposium, featuring award-winning creators and academic experts, will unmask superheroes across all eras and media platforms.

Featuring industry interviews and panels alongside presentations from leading superhero scholars.

Keynote speakers and industry guests will include:

Professor Henry Jenkins (Live stream)
Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education at the University of Southern California, and author of landmark fan and transmedia research including Convergence Culture: Where Old & New Media Collide.

Paul Dini
Writer of the Emmy Award-winning Batman: The Animated Series, best-selling video game Batman: Arkham Asylum and the Eisner Award-winning comic Mad Love.

Hope Larson
Eisner Award-winning graphic novelist of A Wrinkle in Time, co-creator of Boom! Comic’s Goldie Vance and writer of DC Comics new reimagining of Batgirl.

Nicola Scott
A comic book artist from Sydney whose notable works include Birds of Prey and Secret Six. As of 2016, she is drawing Wonder Woman for DC Comics.

Tom Taylor
Is a multi-award-winning and #1 New York Times bestselling author, playwright and screenwriter. Tom is currently the writer of the Batman/Superman series for DC Comics and All-New Wolverine for MARVEL.

The symposium is one of the events organised as part of an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant partnership between the University of Melbourne, Swinburne University of Technology, National University of Singapore and the Australian Centre for the Moving Image.

Cost: Full: $190
Concession: $155

When
Thursday, 8 December 2016, 9:00 am

Where
Cinema 1, Cinema 2, The Cube, Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Flinders Street/Federation Square, Melbourne

Booking
Posted in Culture and Communication, Events

Making the Case for Impact in Languages Research: The UK experience

Description

With Australia set to follow the lead of the United Kingdom in assessing the impact of research beyond the academy, scholars in the humanities, in particular in languages and area studies, will be faced with the daunting task of arguing the case for the benefits of public investment in their research.

This workshop will present some successful case studies from the UK’s REF impact exercise at Oxford University, focusing on ways in which the rich and varied benefits of languages, poetry, creative writing and translation can be articulated and turned into knowledge transfer/engagement activities with the media, schools and the broader community.

When
Monday, 5 December 2016, 2:00 pm

Where
Room 553, Discursive Space, Arts West

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Theoretical Territory: Geographical Thought and the City in China

Description

From imperial cities to local temples and common houses, Asian landscapes demonstrate discerning placements and diagnostic spatial practices whose symbolisms continue to inflect contemporary geographies. Among these, however, new cities in China would appear more often to challenge local history in favour of economic exuberance and global reach.

Where the rush to document increasingly urban China finds expansive extent, diversity of forms and proliferation of images, this talk suggests how portrayals of such maximal aesthetics bely the reality that defining the Chinese city remains under constitutional power to change state space through the administrative divisions or xingzheng quhua 行政区划 – from establishing new cities to merging and disappearing others.

The Chinese Communist Party has also evolved ‘model city’ programs that continue Mao era models used to idealize and implement socialist practices and political thought. In response, theoretical understandings of territory contribute to co-situating such apparently disparate lines of inquiry as the visual landscape and built environment, party-state governance and debates over the role of the state and the market in China’s ongoing transformation. In reflection on the unprecedented instantiation of the city as the intermediate echelon of state and society in China, this discussion makes a case for the pivotal role of historical state practices in China’s contemporary urban process.

When
Wednesday, 23 November 2016, 5:30 pm

Where
Evan Williams Theatre, Richard Berry Building

Posted in Asia Institute, Events

Diaspora Entrepreneurship: A Closer Look at Korean Diaspora Entrepreneurs in Australia

Description

This public conference will be a pivotal event to stimulate pre-eminent academics in migration studies, sociologists and business scholars to conduct academic research and produce research outputs. Despite the fact that Korean migrants show a higher rate of becoming entrepreneurs and consequently forming business clusters in specific areas of high Korean population, there is a lack of research to identify contexts, consequences and implication of facts into the Australian community widely.

Three parties of participants will benefit from this conference as follows:
Academics: Grounds will be set for future academic research in the area of migration studies, sociology and business with attempts to suggest practical research outcomes for policy makers and the general public to explore and implement.

Policy makers: Australia is a multicultural country and its strength will greatly be enhanced by integrating strengths of various cultures into the Australian system. Policy makers will benefit from hearing the views of academics and the general public.

Korean diaspora entrepreneurs & the general public: The conference will offer the opportunity for front runners to express their challenges and suggest resolutions or the benefit of Australia.

This event is organised by the Asia Institute and Centre for Asian Business and Economics (University of Melbourne), with support from the Korean Studies Grant Program through the Ministry of Education of Republic of Korea and Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS-2016-K39).

This is a free event but registration is required as seats are limited. Morning tea and lunch will be provided to registered participants.

When
Thursday, 17 November 2016, 8:30 am

Where
Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room (Level 1), Sidney Myer Asia Centre

Booking
Posted in Asia Institute, Events

A More Useful Role for Australia in Preventive Diplomacy?

Description

Many of the most catastrophic wars of recent times, from Iraq to Yugoslavia, were preventable. Even small countries like Australia can develop capacities for 'relational diplomacy' that make this possible. However, Australia also has responsibilities to help prevent smaller scale wars that have a risk of re-igniting in our region, such as in Bougainville. In this presentation, John Braithwaite will discuss the need for Australia to be more innovative in responding to both these large and small relational challenges.

John Braithwaite is a Distinguished Professor, and founder of the School of Regulation and Global Governance, at the Australian National University.

When
Thursday, 10 November 2016, 5:30 pm

Where
Theatre 1, Alan Gilbert Building, Grattan Street

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Dusty Boxes: A Backstage History of Museums

Description

The history of museums has mostly centred around questions of exhibiting, display and spectatorship. But museums do not just consist of exhibition halls. They are composed of vast hidden spaces, where the majority of museum objects are kept.

In this talk Dr Mirjam Brusius will address the binary between ‘display’ and ‘backstage’ of museums from a historical angle. Backstage areas were never simply areas where potential display objects are kept. They performed functions that, when studied, reveal deep purposes of the museum that go well beyond a mere history of display. They often included archives, study centres and libraries, which were places of scholarly encounter. The talk will also raise some fundamental questions about the nature of museums today. Why do museums store objects they might never display, and which intentions might those objects fulfill?

Mirjam Brusius is a Research Associate at the University of Oxford.

When
Monday, 7 November 2016, 6:30 pm

Where
Forum Theatre, Level 1, Arts West Building, Professor's Walk

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

The History of Medieval Islamic Medicine

Description

The medical tradition, which developed in the lands of Islam from the seventh century AD onwards, is rich and variegated. Its history stretches over more than a millennium, and involves people of many languages (Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Syriac, Hebrew) and faiths (Muslims, Jews, Christians, Zoroastrians, and pagans). Given the breadth of this field, this lecture will focus on several key themes expressed through individual examples, and illustrated by miniatures, diagrams, and artefacts. These themes include:

The Emergence of Islamic Medicine: During the classical age of Islam and under the aegis of the ‘Abbasids' (ca. 750–950), an extremely sophisticated medical tradition emerged. Based mainly on Greek medical theory and practice, it blended its own heritage with the legacy of the other cultures with which it was in contact including the Byzantines, Alexandrians, Sasanians, and Syriac-speaking Christians.

Medical Theory: The system adopted in the learned medical tradition is generally Galenic, and its main features will be explored briefly. We will notably look at Ibn al-Nafis’ ‘discovery’ of the pulmonary transit (and dispel some myths surrounding this topic). In addition we will examine how medical knowledge was organised in some of the most famous medical encyclopaedias of the time, including Avicenna’s Canon.

Medical Practice: In recent times, scholars have raised the question as to what extent the theory described in the medical manuals corresponded to actual practice. Here again, some myths (such as Caesarean sections) will be dispelled, whilst interesting cases of clinical innovation will be presented.

Physicians and Society: Who were the doctors of Damascus and Toledo, and of Cairo and Baghdad? How did they function within the larger society? What public health initiatives were deployed to provide the poor as well as the powerful with access to medical care? These questions will be discussed, with special reference to the hospital and other institutions of Islamic charity, for which the Muslim Middle Ages are deservedly famous.

Popular Medicine: Magic and divination, pious ritual and prophetic medicine formed as much a part of the therapeutic arsenal as more ‘learned’ practices. We will briefly look at some texts and artefacts in order to augment our understanding of medieval responses to disease.

Continuous tradition: To conclude, this lecture will explore the impact of the Islamic medical tradition on both Western and Eastern medicine. European university medicine emerged on the basis of this tradition (in Latin translation), and still continues to be practised today, not only in the Muslim world, but also in the West. It is this examination of these continuities that will round out this thematic historical overview.

Presenter Peter E. Pormann, D.Litt., M.A., D.Phil., M.Phil. (Oxon); M.A. (Leiden); FRAS, is Professor of Classics and Graeco-Arabic Studies at the University of Manchester.

When
Friday, 4 November 2016, 4:00 pm

Where
The Forum Theatre 153, Level 1, Arts West

Booking
Posted in Events, Historical and Philosophical Studies

Civil Society Resistance to State Violence and Corruption

Description

Civil society resistance has the power to expose and ultimately challenge state crime, violence, and corruption. It occurs not only in places where ‘the rule of law’ is absent or precarious, but also in those which have a normative commitment to upholding it. In this seminar, Professor Penny Green will explore the complicated and interdependent relationship between organised civil society and the state. She will contend that the concept of ‘civil society’ is central to understanding both crimes committed by the state and its responses to the crimes of others.

Drawing on extensive fieldwork in Turkey, Tunisia, Burma, Kenya, PNG, Colombia and Israel/Palestine, Professor Green will explore some of the ways in which civil society resistance emerges, survives, and sometimes even ‘flourishes’ under conditions of dictatorship, state violence, and repression. She will examine the role politics, human rights, violence, religion, and charity play when the stakes in demanding justice are very high. Despite the reasons underpinning civil society resistance, this lecture will ultimately highlight how complex and fragile it is to unmask and challenge state criminality.

When
Thursday, 17 November 2016, 5:30 pm

Where
Theatre 219, Kwong Lee Dow Building, 234 Queensberry Street

Booking
Posted in Events, Social and Political Sciences

Cuisine and the Construction of Russian National Identity

Description

Professor Darra Goldstein explores Russian national identity and cuisine from the 18th century into the present.

This talk explores Russian national identity and cuisine from the 18th century into the present. Ever since Peter the Great opened his country to the West, the Russians have struggled with ambivalence toward outside influences. This unease has extended beyond political wariness into cuisine, with Western foodways alternately embraced and rejected over the years.

Today, following Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, Western food is again politically fraught. The economic sanctions imposed by Europe, Australia, and the U.S. have led Russia to ban imports of meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, and dairy products, causing widespread food shortages. Where Soviet Customs officers once seized illicit magazines and books, Russian Border Control now confiscates cheese and other Western foodstuffs.

Russians are famously accustomed to deprivation, but these latest shortages have led not to resignation but to a gradual revival of artisanal production that is transforming Russia’s gastronomic landscape. We can see a new form of nationalism being played out in the culinary sphere.

Professor Darra Goldstein is the Willcox B. and Harriet M. Adsit Professor of Russian at Williams College and Founding Editor of Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture. She has published widely on literature, culture, art, and cuisine.

Supported by the Macgeorge Bequest.

When
Tuesday, 22 November 2016, 6:00 pm

Where
Discursive Space (Level 5, Room 553), Arts West

Booking
Posted in Events, Languages and Linguistics

Regions of the Contemporary: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in 1990s Southeast Asia

Description

Join us for this three-day symposium to reflect on critical events for transnational contemporary art across Southeast Asia in the 1990s. Informed by recent archival research undertaken into Chiang Mai Social Installation (CMSI), an artist-initiated festival held in northern Thailand (see Simon Soon's essay in the upcoming issue of Afterall), we propose three key questions for discussion:

  1. How did CMSI, and gatherings like it, inform and displace the more deliberate, institutional pictures of a region propagated elsewhere, for example by large triennials in Brisbane and Fukuoka?

  2. If Southeast Asia was still peripheral to the art world’s centres in the 1990s, its artists decisively joined that world during that decade, experimenting with art forms — performance, site-specific installation, participatory and so-called relational practices — that had special currency in the burgeoning global art circuit. But what was their currency within the region itself?

  3. Enquiries framed as ‘exhibition histories’ may be able to do better justice to the specific local conditions of art’s presentation and reception, but were exhibitions the critical junctures that precipitated post-national contemporary art, or were they the means to other ends?

This symposium will examine the forms and contexts of artistic and curatorial practice, the modes of organisation, and the importance of artist-to-artist relationships across an emergent Southeast Asian art world in the 1990s.

This symposium is co-organised by Afterall and the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne. It will test ideas for forthcoming books in the Afterall's Exhibition Histories series, produced in collaboration with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

This symposium is free and open to all.

Symposium Schedule – Public Programme Day 1: Saturday 5 November: 15:00–16:30 Chang Mai Social Installation: From the Vault

17:30–19:00: Panel 1 Regions of the Contemporary

Day 2: Sunday 6 November 14:.00–15:30. Panel 2 Chang Mai Social Installation in Focus

16:00–17:30. Panel 3 Artist to Artist: Transnational Art Festivals and Exhibitions in Southeast Asia

18:00–19:30. Panel 4 Landscape of the Global: How Curators/Artists Created Contemporary Art

Day 3: Monday 7 November 15:00–16:00. Keir Foundation Lecture Prof. Apinan Poshyananda on the emergence of Thai contemporary art.

A detailed program and further information is available via the ''website information" link.

When
Saturday, 5 November 2016, 3:00 pm

Where
Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Sidney Myer Asia Centre

Posted in Culture and Communication, Events